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What do health-promoting schools promote? processes and outcomes of health-promoting achools

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What do health-promoting schools promote? processes and outcomes of health-promoting achools. / Simovska, Venka.

In: Health Education, Vol. 122, No. 2, 20.02.2012, p. 84-87.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperEditorialResearchpeer-review

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@article{b7dceffdaca84836bd6ae30adc3a34c6,
title = "What do health-promoting schools promote?: processes and outcomes of health-promoting achools",
abstract = "Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer review process, nine submissions were accepted for publication. Five of these are selected to be published in this issue and the rest will be published in a future issue of the journal.Findings – The five articles in this issue take a comprehensive approach to health promotion in schools and reflect on the related processes and outcomes. Although diverse in focus and research methodology, the five contributions all emphasise that the question about the outcomes of the health-promoting schools cannot, and should not be limited to narrowly defined health outcomes achieved through single health-promotion interventions. Directly or indirectly the articles reiterate the idea that health promotion in schools needs to be linked with the core task of the school – education, and to the values inherent to education, such as inclusion, democracy, participation and influence, critical literacy and action competence in relation to health.",
keywords = "Health educaion, Health Promotion, Schools, Participation",
author = "Venka Simovska",
year = "2012",
month = feb,
day = "20",
language = "English",
volume = "122",
pages = "84--87",
journal = "Health Education",
issn = "0965-4283",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do health-promoting schools promote?

T2 - processes and outcomes of health-promoting achools

AU - Simovska, Venka

PY - 2012/2/20

Y1 - 2012/2/20

N2 - Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer review process, nine submissions were accepted for publication. Five of these are selected to be published in this issue and the rest will be published in a future issue of the journal.Findings – The five articles in this issue take a comprehensive approach to health promotion in schools and reflect on the related processes and outcomes. Although diverse in focus and research methodology, the five contributions all emphasise that the question about the outcomes of the health-promoting schools cannot, and should not be limited to narrowly defined health outcomes achieved through single health-promotion interventions. Directly or indirectly the articles reiterate the idea that health promotion in schools needs to be linked with the core task of the school – education, and to the values inherent to education, such as inclusion, democracy, participation and influence, critical literacy and action competence in relation to health.

AB - Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer review process, nine submissions were accepted for publication. Five of these are selected to be published in this issue and the rest will be published in a future issue of the journal.Findings – The five articles in this issue take a comprehensive approach to health promotion in schools and reflect on the related processes and outcomes. Although diverse in focus and research methodology, the five contributions all emphasise that the question about the outcomes of the health-promoting schools cannot, and should not be limited to narrowly defined health outcomes achieved through single health-promotion interventions. Directly or indirectly the articles reiterate the idea that health promotion in schools needs to be linked with the core task of the school – education, and to the values inherent to education, such as inclusion, democracy, participation and influence, critical literacy and action competence in relation to health.

KW - Health educaion

KW - Health Promotion

KW - Schools

KW - Participation

M3 - Editorial

VL - 122

SP - 84

EP - 87

JO - Health Education

JF - Health Education

SN - 0965-4283

IS - 2

ER -