Department of Economics and Business Economics

Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on

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Vitamin D and schizophrenia : 20 years on. / Cui, Xiaoying; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J et al.

In: Molecular Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 7, 07.2021, p. 2708-2720.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Cui, X, McGrath, JJ, Burne, THJ & Eyles, DW 2021, 'Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on', Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 2708-2720. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

APA

Cui, X., McGrath, J. J., Burne, T. H. J., & Eyles, D. W. (2021). Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on. Molecular Psychiatry, 26(7), 2708-2720. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

CBE

Cui X, McGrath JJ, Burne THJ, Eyles DW. 2021. Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on. Molecular Psychiatry. 26(7):2708-2720. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

MLA

Cui, Xiaoying et al. "Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on". Molecular Psychiatry. 2021, 26(7). 2708-2720. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

Vancouver

Cui X, McGrath JJ, Burne THJ, Eyles DW. Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on. Molecular Psychiatry. 2021 Jul;26(7):2708-2720. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

Author

Cui, Xiaoying ; McGrath, John J ; Burne, Thomas H J et al. / Vitamin D and schizophrenia : 20 years on. In: Molecular Psychiatry. 2021 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 2708-2720.

Bibtex

@article{82fcc8d4dfad45a387a58b1a965859f0,
title = "Vitamin D and schizophrenia: 20 years on",
abstract = "Many epidemiological studies have highlighted the link between vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia. In particular, two prominent studies report an association between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of schizophrenia. In parallel, much has been learnt about the role of vitamin D in the developing central nervous system over the last two decades. Studies in rodent models of developmental vitamin D (DVD)-deficiency describe how brain development is altered leading to a range of neurobiological and behavioral phenotypes of interest to schizophrenia. While glutamate and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) systems have been little investigated in these models, alterations in developing dopamine systems are frequently reported. There have been far more studies reporting patients with schizophrenia have an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency compared to well controls. Here we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis that basically confirms this association and extends this to first-episode psychosis. However, patients with schizophrenia also have poorer general health, poorer diets, are frequently less active and also have an increased risk of other medical conditions, all factors which reduce circulating vitamin D levels. Therefore, we would urge caution in any causal interpretation of this association. We also summarize the inconsistent results from existing vitamin D supplementation trials in patients with schizophrenia. In respect to animal models of adult vitamin D deficiency, such exposures produce subtle neurochemical alterations and effects on cognition but do not appear to produce behavioral phenotypes of relevance to schizophrenia. We conclude, the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency during early life may increase the risk of schizophrenia remains plausible and warrants ongoing research.",
keywords = "1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D-3, ADULT-RAT, BRAIN-DEVELOPMENT, D DEFICIENCY ALTERS, D DVD DEFICIENCY, D SUPPLEMENTATION, D-RECEPTOR, NERVE GROWTH-FACTOR, SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA, TYROSINE-HYDROXYLASE EXPRESSION",
author = "Xiaoying Cui and McGrath, {John J} and Burne, {Thomas H J} and Eyles, {Darryl W}",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "2708--2720",
journal = "Molecular Psychiatry",
issn = "1359-4184",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vitamin D and schizophrenia

T2 - 20 years on

AU - Cui, Xiaoying

AU - McGrath, John J

AU - Burne, Thomas H J

AU - Eyles, Darryl W

PY - 2021/7

Y1 - 2021/7

N2 - Many epidemiological studies have highlighted the link between vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia. In particular, two prominent studies report an association between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of schizophrenia. In parallel, much has been learnt about the role of vitamin D in the developing central nervous system over the last two decades. Studies in rodent models of developmental vitamin D (DVD)-deficiency describe how brain development is altered leading to a range of neurobiological and behavioral phenotypes of interest to schizophrenia. While glutamate and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) systems have been little investigated in these models, alterations in developing dopamine systems are frequently reported. There have been far more studies reporting patients with schizophrenia have an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency compared to well controls. Here we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis that basically confirms this association and extends this to first-episode psychosis. However, patients with schizophrenia also have poorer general health, poorer diets, are frequently less active and also have an increased risk of other medical conditions, all factors which reduce circulating vitamin D levels. Therefore, we would urge caution in any causal interpretation of this association. We also summarize the inconsistent results from existing vitamin D supplementation trials in patients with schizophrenia. In respect to animal models of adult vitamin D deficiency, such exposures produce subtle neurochemical alterations and effects on cognition but do not appear to produce behavioral phenotypes of relevance to schizophrenia. We conclude, the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency during early life may increase the risk of schizophrenia remains plausible and warrants ongoing research.

AB - Many epidemiological studies have highlighted the link between vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia. In particular, two prominent studies report an association between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of schizophrenia. In parallel, much has been learnt about the role of vitamin D in the developing central nervous system over the last two decades. Studies in rodent models of developmental vitamin D (DVD)-deficiency describe how brain development is altered leading to a range of neurobiological and behavioral phenotypes of interest to schizophrenia. While glutamate and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) systems have been little investigated in these models, alterations in developing dopamine systems are frequently reported. There have been far more studies reporting patients with schizophrenia have an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency compared to well controls. Here we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis that basically confirms this association and extends this to first-episode psychosis. However, patients with schizophrenia also have poorer general health, poorer diets, are frequently less active and also have an increased risk of other medical conditions, all factors which reduce circulating vitamin D levels. Therefore, we would urge caution in any causal interpretation of this association. We also summarize the inconsistent results from existing vitamin D supplementation trials in patients with schizophrenia. In respect to animal models of adult vitamin D deficiency, such exposures produce subtle neurochemical alterations and effects on cognition but do not appear to produce behavioral phenotypes of relevance to schizophrenia. We conclude, the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency during early life may increase the risk of schizophrenia remains plausible and warrants ongoing research.

KW - 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D-3

KW - ADULT-RAT

KW - BRAIN-DEVELOPMENT

KW - D DEFICIENCY ALTERS

KW - D DVD DEFICIENCY

KW - D SUPPLEMENTATION

KW - D-RECEPTOR

KW - NERVE GROWTH-FACTOR

KW - SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA

KW - TYROSINE-HYDROXYLASE EXPRESSION

U2 - 10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

DO - 10.1038/s41380-021-01025-0

M3 - Review

C2 - 33500553

VL - 26

SP - 2708

EP - 2720

JO - Molecular Psychiatry

JF - Molecular Psychiatry

SN - 1359-4184

IS - 7

ER -