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Valence, form, and content of self-talk predict sport type and level of performance

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Valence, form, and content of self-talk predict sport type and level of performance. / Nedergaard, Johanne; Christensen, Mark Schram; Wallentin, Mikkel.

In: Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 89, 19.02.2021, p. 103102.

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@article{d25a848c71c345018fb0adcecbd79438,
title = "Valence, form, and content of self-talk predict sport type and level of performance",
abstract = "In this paper, we aimed to test whether we could predict sport type (badminton or running) and marathon proficiency from the valence, form, and content of the athletes' self-reported inner speech. Additionally, we wanted to assess the difference between self-talk during high intensity and low intensity exercise. The present study corroborated existing research - we were able to predict both sport type in Study 1 and intensity level as well as marathon proficiency in Study 2 from questionnaire data using machine learning models. In Study 1, we found that badminton players engage more in worry and anxiety-control while runners are more prone to task disengagement. Interestingly, it seemed in Study 2 that the more participants engaged in condensed, positive, and repetitive self-talk when not pushing themselves, the slower their fastest marathons and half marathons were. We discuss potential explanations for these findings and make suggestions for future research.",
author = "Johanne Nedergaard and Christensen, {Mark Schram} and Mikkel Wallentin",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "19",
doi = "10.1016/j.concog.2021.103102",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "103102",
journal = "Consciousness and Cognition",
issn = "1053-8100",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Valence, form, and content of self-talk predict sport type and level of performance

AU - Nedergaard, Johanne

AU - Christensen, Mark Schram

AU - Wallentin, Mikkel

N1 - Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/2/19

Y1 - 2021/2/19

N2 - In this paper, we aimed to test whether we could predict sport type (badminton or running) and marathon proficiency from the valence, form, and content of the athletes' self-reported inner speech. Additionally, we wanted to assess the difference between self-talk during high intensity and low intensity exercise. The present study corroborated existing research - we were able to predict both sport type in Study 1 and intensity level as well as marathon proficiency in Study 2 from questionnaire data using machine learning models. In Study 1, we found that badminton players engage more in worry and anxiety-control while runners are more prone to task disengagement. Interestingly, it seemed in Study 2 that the more participants engaged in condensed, positive, and repetitive self-talk when not pushing themselves, the slower their fastest marathons and half marathons were. We discuss potential explanations for these findings and make suggestions for future research.

AB - In this paper, we aimed to test whether we could predict sport type (badminton or running) and marathon proficiency from the valence, form, and content of the athletes' self-reported inner speech. Additionally, we wanted to assess the difference between self-talk during high intensity and low intensity exercise. The present study corroborated existing research - we were able to predict both sport type in Study 1 and intensity level as well as marathon proficiency in Study 2 from questionnaire data using machine learning models. In Study 1, we found that badminton players engage more in worry and anxiety-control while runners are more prone to task disengagement. Interestingly, it seemed in Study 2 that the more participants engaged in condensed, positive, and repetitive self-talk when not pushing themselves, the slower their fastest marathons and half marathons were. We discuss potential explanations for these findings and make suggestions for future research.

U2 - 10.1016/j.concog.2021.103102

DO - 10.1016/j.concog.2021.103102

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33618165

VL - 89

SP - 103102

JO - Consciousness and Cognition

JF - Consciousness and Cognition

SN - 1053-8100

ER -