Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

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Towards a unified study of multiple stressors : divisions and common goals across research disciplines. / Orr, James A.; Vinebrooke, Rolf D.; Jackson, Michelle C.; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Kordas, Rebecca L.; Mantyka-Pringle, Chrystal; Van den Brink, Paul J.; De Laender, Frederik; Stoks, Robby; Holmstrup, Martin; Matthaei, Christoph D.; Monk, Wendy A.; Penk, Marcin R.; Leuzinger, Sebastian; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Piggott, Jeremy J.

In: Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences, Vol. 287, No. 1926, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Orr, JA, Vinebrooke, RD, Jackson, MC, Kroeker, KJ, Kordas, RL, Mantyka-Pringle, C, Van den Brink, PJ, De Laender, F, Stoks, R, Holmstrup, M, Matthaei, CD, Monk, WA, Penk, MR, Leuzinger, S, Schäfer, RB & Piggott, JJ 2020, 'Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines', Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences, vol. 287, no. 1926. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

APA

Orr, J. A., Vinebrooke, R. D., Jackson, M. C., Kroeker, K. J., Kordas, R. L., Mantyka-Pringle, C., Van den Brink, P. J., De Laender, F., Stoks, R., Holmstrup, M., Matthaei, C. D., Monk, W. A., Penk, M. R., Leuzinger, S., Schäfer, R. B., & Piggott, J. J. (2020). Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines. Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences, 287(1926). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

CBE

Orr JA, Vinebrooke RD, Jackson MC, Kroeker KJ, Kordas RL, Mantyka-Pringle C, Van den Brink PJ, De Laender F, Stoks R, Holmstrup M, Matthaei CD, Monk WA, Penk MR, Leuzinger S, Schäfer RB, Piggott JJ. 2020. Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines. Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences. 287(1926). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

MLA

Orr, James A. et al. "Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines". Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences. 2020. 287(1926). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

Vancouver

Orr JA, Vinebrooke RD, Jackson MC, Kroeker KJ, Kordas RL, Mantyka-Pringle C et al. Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines. Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences. 2020;287(1926). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

Author

Orr, James A. ; Vinebrooke, Rolf D. ; Jackson, Michelle C. ; Kroeker, Kristy J. ; Kordas, Rebecca L. ; Mantyka-Pringle, Chrystal ; Van den Brink, Paul J. ; De Laender, Frederik ; Stoks, Robby ; Holmstrup, Martin ; Matthaei, Christoph D. ; Monk, Wendy A. ; Penk, Marcin R. ; Leuzinger, Sebastian ; Schäfer, Ralf B. ; Piggott, Jeremy J. / Towards a unified study of multiple stressors : divisions and common goals across research disciplines. In: Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences. 2020 ; Vol. 287, No. 1926.

Bibtex

@article{920046710f0d44f0a0e1042926900334,
title = "Towards a unified study of multiple stressors: divisions and common goals across research disciplines",
abstract = "Anthropogenic environmental changes, or 'stressors', increasingly threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. Multiple-stressor research is a rapidly expanding field of science that seeks to understand and ultimately predict the interactions between stressors. Reviews and meta-analyses of the primary scientific literature have largely been specific to either freshwater, marine or terrestrial ecology, or ecotoxicology. In this cross-disciplinary study, we review the state of knowledge within and among these disciplines to highlight commonality and division in multiple-stressor research. Our review goes beyond a description of previous research by using quantitative bibliometric analysis to identify the division between disciplines and link previously disconnected research communities. Towards a unified research framework, we discuss the shared goal of increased realism through both ecological and temporal complexity, with the overarching aim of improving predictive power. In a rapidly changing world, advancing our understanding of the cumulative ecological impacts of multiple stressors is critical for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management. Identifying and overcoming the barriers to interdisciplinary knowledge exchange is necessary in rising to this challenge. Division between ecosystem types and disciplines is largely a human creation. Species and stressors cross these borders and so should the scientists who study them.",
keywords = "antagonism, combined effects, global change factors, multiple drivers, multiple stressors, synergism",
author = "Orr, {James A.} and Vinebrooke, {Rolf D.} and Jackson, {Michelle C.} and Kroeker, {Kristy J.} and Kordas, {Rebecca L.} and Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and {Van den Brink}, {Paul J.} and {De Laender}, Frederik and Robby Stoks and Martin Holmstrup and Matthaei, {Christoph D.} and Monk, {Wendy A.} and Penk, {Marcin R.} and Sebastian Leuzinger and Sch{\"a}fer, {Ralf B.} and Piggott, {Jeremy J.}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1098/rspb.2020.0421",
language = "English",
volume = "287",
journal = "Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8452",
publisher = "The Royal Society Publishing",
number = "1926",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Towards a unified study of multiple stressors

T2 - divisions and common goals across research disciplines

AU - Orr, James A.

AU - Vinebrooke, Rolf D.

AU - Jackson, Michelle C.

AU - Kroeker, Kristy J.

AU - Kordas, Rebecca L.

AU - Mantyka-Pringle, Chrystal

AU - Van den Brink, Paul J.

AU - De Laender, Frederik

AU - Stoks, Robby

AU - Holmstrup, Martin

AU - Matthaei, Christoph D.

AU - Monk, Wendy A.

AU - Penk, Marcin R.

AU - Leuzinger, Sebastian

AU - Schäfer, Ralf B.

AU - Piggott, Jeremy J.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Anthropogenic environmental changes, or 'stressors', increasingly threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. Multiple-stressor research is a rapidly expanding field of science that seeks to understand and ultimately predict the interactions between stressors. Reviews and meta-analyses of the primary scientific literature have largely been specific to either freshwater, marine or terrestrial ecology, or ecotoxicology. In this cross-disciplinary study, we review the state of knowledge within and among these disciplines to highlight commonality and division in multiple-stressor research. Our review goes beyond a description of previous research by using quantitative bibliometric analysis to identify the division between disciplines and link previously disconnected research communities. Towards a unified research framework, we discuss the shared goal of increased realism through both ecological and temporal complexity, with the overarching aim of improving predictive power. In a rapidly changing world, advancing our understanding of the cumulative ecological impacts of multiple stressors is critical for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management. Identifying and overcoming the barriers to interdisciplinary knowledge exchange is necessary in rising to this challenge. Division between ecosystem types and disciplines is largely a human creation. Species and stressors cross these borders and so should the scientists who study them.

AB - Anthropogenic environmental changes, or 'stressors', increasingly threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. Multiple-stressor research is a rapidly expanding field of science that seeks to understand and ultimately predict the interactions between stressors. Reviews and meta-analyses of the primary scientific literature have largely been specific to either freshwater, marine or terrestrial ecology, or ecotoxicology. In this cross-disciplinary study, we review the state of knowledge within and among these disciplines to highlight commonality and division in multiple-stressor research. Our review goes beyond a description of previous research by using quantitative bibliometric analysis to identify the division between disciplines and link previously disconnected research communities. Towards a unified research framework, we discuss the shared goal of increased realism through both ecological and temporal complexity, with the overarching aim of improving predictive power. In a rapidly changing world, advancing our understanding of the cumulative ecological impacts of multiple stressors is critical for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management. Identifying and overcoming the barriers to interdisciplinary knowledge exchange is necessary in rising to this challenge. Division between ecosystem types and disciplines is largely a human creation. Species and stressors cross these borders and so should the scientists who study them.

KW - antagonism

KW - combined effects

KW - global change factors

KW - multiple drivers

KW - multiple stressors

KW - synergism

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084327953&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

DO - 10.1098/rspb.2020.0421

M3 - Review

C2 - 32370677

AN - SCOPUS:85084327953

VL - 287

JO - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8452

IS - 1926

ER -