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The human sexual response cycle: Brain imaging evidence linking sex to other pleasures

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The human sexual response cycle : Brain imaging evidence linking sex to other pleasures. / Georgiadis, J R; Kringelbach, Morten L.

In: Progress in Neurobiology, Vol. 98, No. 1, 2012, p. 49-81.

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Georgiadis, J R ; Kringelbach, Morten L. / The human sexual response cycle : Brain imaging evidence linking sex to other pleasures. In: Progress in Neurobiology. 2012 ; Vol. 98, No. 1. pp. 49-81.

Bibtex

@article{e5f7b61ce8d744e19c7b3ce42f2f079a,
title = "The human sexual response cycle: Brain imaging evidence linking sex to other pleasures",
abstract = "Sexual behavior is critical to species survival, yet comparatively little is known about the neural mechanisms in the human brain. Here we systematically review the existing human brain imaging literature on sexual behavior and show that the functional neuroanatomy of sexual behavior is comparable to that involved in processing other rewarding stimuli. Sexual behavior clearly follows the established principles and phases for wanting, liking and satiety involved in the pleasure cycle of other rewards. The studies have uncovered the brain networks involved in sexual wanting or motivation/anticipation, as well as sexual liking or arousal/consummation, while there is very little data on sexual satiety or post-orgasmic refractory period. Human sexual behavior also interacts with other pleasures, most notably social interaction and high arousal states. We discuss the changes in the underlying brain networks supporting sexual behavior in the context of the pleasure cycle, the changes to this cycle over the individual's life-time and the interactions between them. Overall, it is clear from the data that the functional neuroanatomy of sex is very similar to that of other pleasures and that it is unlikely that there is anything special about the brain mechanisms and networks underlying sex.",
author = "Georgiadis, {J R} and Kringelbach, {Morten L.}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.pneurobio.2012.05.004",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "49--81",
journal = "Progress in Neurobiology",
issn = "0301-0082",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The human sexual response cycle

T2 - Brain imaging evidence linking sex to other pleasures

AU - Georgiadis, J R

AU - Kringelbach, Morten L.

N1 - Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Sexual behavior is critical to species survival, yet comparatively little is known about the neural mechanisms in the human brain. Here we systematically review the existing human brain imaging literature on sexual behavior and show that the functional neuroanatomy of sexual behavior is comparable to that involved in processing other rewarding stimuli. Sexual behavior clearly follows the established principles and phases for wanting, liking and satiety involved in the pleasure cycle of other rewards. The studies have uncovered the brain networks involved in sexual wanting or motivation/anticipation, as well as sexual liking or arousal/consummation, while there is very little data on sexual satiety or post-orgasmic refractory period. Human sexual behavior also interacts with other pleasures, most notably social interaction and high arousal states. We discuss the changes in the underlying brain networks supporting sexual behavior in the context of the pleasure cycle, the changes to this cycle over the individual's life-time and the interactions between them. Overall, it is clear from the data that the functional neuroanatomy of sex is very similar to that of other pleasures and that it is unlikely that there is anything special about the brain mechanisms and networks underlying sex.

AB - Sexual behavior is critical to species survival, yet comparatively little is known about the neural mechanisms in the human brain. Here we systematically review the existing human brain imaging literature on sexual behavior and show that the functional neuroanatomy of sexual behavior is comparable to that involved in processing other rewarding stimuli. Sexual behavior clearly follows the established principles and phases for wanting, liking and satiety involved in the pleasure cycle of other rewards. The studies have uncovered the brain networks involved in sexual wanting or motivation/anticipation, as well as sexual liking or arousal/consummation, while there is very little data on sexual satiety or post-orgasmic refractory period. Human sexual behavior also interacts with other pleasures, most notably social interaction and high arousal states. We discuss the changes in the underlying brain networks supporting sexual behavior in the context of the pleasure cycle, the changes to this cycle over the individual's life-time and the interactions between them. Overall, it is clear from the data that the functional neuroanatomy of sex is very similar to that of other pleasures and that it is unlikely that there is anything special about the brain mechanisms and networks underlying sex.

U2 - 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2012.05.004

DO - 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2012.05.004

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22609047

VL - 98

SP - 49

EP - 81

JO - Progress in Neurobiology

JF - Progress in Neurobiology

SN - 0301-0082

IS - 1

ER -