Department of Economics and Business Economics

The effects of practicing target-shooting sport on the severity of inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive symptoms in children: a non-randomised controlled open-label study in Denmark

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The effects of practicing target-shooting sport on the severity of inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive symptoms in children : a non-randomised controlled open-label study in Denmark. / Gohr Månsson, Annegrete; Elmose, Mette; Mejldal, Anna et al.

In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 73, No. 4-5, 04.07.2019, p. 233-243.

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Gohr Månsson, Annegrete ; Elmose, Mette ; Mejldal, Anna et al. / The effects of practicing target-shooting sport on the severity of inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive symptoms in children : a non-randomised controlled open-label study in Denmark. In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry. 2019 ; Vol. 73, No. 4-5. pp. 233-243.

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@article{6c4f82d0c70d47e4ab73b275e67e10a2,
title = "The effects of practicing target-shooting sport on the severity of inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive symptoms in children: a non-randomised controlled open-label study in Denmark",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Target-shooting sport requires mental effort and concentration. Training may reduce inattentiveness and distractibility. There is little knowledge if children with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) benefit from practicing target-shooting sport.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study aims to investigate this in a non-randomised controlled open-label study of 128 children, 10-14 years of age, with ADHD-symptoms. The intervention-group (n = 64) practiced target-shooting in local shooting associations once a week for 6 months. The control group (n = 64) received treatment as usual.PRIMARY OUTCOME: teacher-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score.SECONDARY OUTCOMES: (a) parent-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score; (b) teacher- and parent-rated Strengths-and-Difficulties-Questionnaire (SDQ); (c) self-rated quality of life (KIDSCREEN-27-total score); and (d) four objective measurements of ADHD-symptoms using the QbTest{\texttrademark}. The data were collected at baseline and after 6 months.RESULTS: When estimating the marginal effect of the intervention on our primary outcome, the teacher-rated ADHD-RS-IV, we found no significant effect (mean change between groups (contrast)=2.23; p = 0.193). However, we did find significant beneficial effects on four of the eight secondary outcomes, including the parent-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score (contrast = 4.76; p = 0.024), the parent-rated SDQ-total score (contrast = 2.09; p = 0.027), and on the QbTest{\texttrademark} measurements of the Reaction Time Variation (RTVar) (contrast = 36.96; p = 0.013), and of Omission Errors (contrast = 7.57; p = 0.019).CONCLUSIONS: Despite the negative result on the primary outcome, the robust findings on these secondary outcomes in this open-label study indicate proof of concept that practicing target-shooting sport may have some beneficial effects on the severity of ADHD-symptoms in children. No adverse events were reported. Randomised trials of this non-pharmacological intervention are needed.",
keywords = "ADHD, Children, hyperactivity, inattention, non-pharmacological interventions, physical activity",
author = "{Gohr M{\aa}nsson}, Annegrete and Mette Elmose and Anna Mejldal and S{\o}ren Dalsgaard and Roessler, {Kirsten K}",
year = "2019",
month = jul,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/08039488.2019.1612467",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "233--243",
journal = "Nordic Journal of Psychiatry. Supplement",
issn = "0803-9496",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis A B",
number = "4-5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of practicing target-shooting sport on the severity of inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive symptoms in children

T2 - a non-randomised controlled open-label study in Denmark

AU - Gohr Månsson, Annegrete

AU - Elmose, Mette

AU - Mejldal, Anna

AU - Dalsgaard, Søren

AU - Roessler, Kirsten K

PY - 2019/7/4

Y1 - 2019/7/4

N2 - PURPOSE: Target-shooting sport requires mental effort and concentration. Training may reduce inattentiveness and distractibility. There is little knowledge if children with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) benefit from practicing target-shooting sport.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study aims to investigate this in a non-randomised controlled open-label study of 128 children, 10-14 years of age, with ADHD-symptoms. The intervention-group (n = 64) practiced target-shooting in local shooting associations once a week for 6 months. The control group (n = 64) received treatment as usual.PRIMARY OUTCOME: teacher-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score.SECONDARY OUTCOMES: (a) parent-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score; (b) teacher- and parent-rated Strengths-and-Difficulties-Questionnaire (SDQ); (c) self-rated quality of life (KIDSCREEN-27-total score); and (d) four objective measurements of ADHD-symptoms using the QbTest™. The data were collected at baseline and after 6 months.RESULTS: When estimating the marginal effect of the intervention on our primary outcome, the teacher-rated ADHD-RS-IV, we found no significant effect (mean change between groups (contrast)=2.23; p = 0.193). However, we did find significant beneficial effects on four of the eight secondary outcomes, including the parent-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score (contrast = 4.76; p = 0.024), the parent-rated SDQ-total score (contrast = 2.09; p = 0.027), and on the QbTest™ measurements of the Reaction Time Variation (RTVar) (contrast = 36.96; p = 0.013), and of Omission Errors (contrast = 7.57; p = 0.019).CONCLUSIONS: Despite the negative result on the primary outcome, the robust findings on these secondary outcomes in this open-label study indicate proof of concept that practicing target-shooting sport may have some beneficial effects on the severity of ADHD-symptoms in children. No adverse events were reported. Randomised trials of this non-pharmacological intervention are needed.

AB - PURPOSE: Target-shooting sport requires mental effort and concentration. Training may reduce inattentiveness and distractibility. There is little knowledge if children with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) benefit from practicing target-shooting sport.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study aims to investigate this in a non-randomised controlled open-label study of 128 children, 10-14 years of age, with ADHD-symptoms. The intervention-group (n = 64) practiced target-shooting in local shooting associations once a week for 6 months. The control group (n = 64) received treatment as usual.PRIMARY OUTCOME: teacher-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score.SECONDARY OUTCOMES: (a) parent-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score; (b) teacher- and parent-rated Strengths-and-Difficulties-Questionnaire (SDQ); (c) self-rated quality of life (KIDSCREEN-27-total score); and (d) four objective measurements of ADHD-symptoms using the QbTest™. The data were collected at baseline and after 6 months.RESULTS: When estimating the marginal effect of the intervention on our primary outcome, the teacher-rated ADHD-RS-IV, we found no significant effect (mean change between groups (contrast)=2.23; p = 0.193). However, we did find significant beneficial effects on four of the eight secondary outcomes, including the parent-rated ADHD-RS-IV-total score (contrast = 4.76; p = 0.024), the parent-rated SDQ-total score (contrast = 2.09; p = 0.027), and on the QbTest™ measurements of the Reaction Time Variation (RTVar) (contrast = 36.96; p = 0.013), and of Omission Errors (contrast = 7.57; p = 0.019).CONCLUSIONS: Despite the negative result on the primary outcome, the robust findings on these secondary outcomes in this open-label study indicate proof of concept that practicing target-shooting sport may have some beneficial effects on the severity of ADHD-symptoms in children. No adverse events were reported. Randomised trials of this non-pharmacological intervention are needed.

KW - ADHD

KW - Children

KW - hyperactivity

KW - inattention

KW - non-pharmacological interventions

KW - physical activity

U2 - 10.1080/08039488.2019.1612467

DO - 10.1080/08039488.2019.1612467

M3 - Review

C2 - 31107130

VL - 73

SP - 233

EP - 243

JO - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry. Supplement

JF - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry. Supplement

SN - 0803-9496

IS - 4-5

ER -