The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

Claus Højbjerg Gravholt, Rikke Leth-Larsen, Anna Lis Lauridsen, Steffen Thiel, Troels Krarup Hansen, Uffe Holmskov, Rune Weis Naeraa, Jens Sandahl Christiansen

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Abstract

Studies in animals and humans indicate that growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) modulate immune function. Recently, it was reported that GH therapy increased the level of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in normal patients, and that treatment of acromegalics with pegvisomant decreased the levels of MBL. The effect on MBL was thought to be due to a specific action of GH, since IGF-I treatment did not affect MBL. Whether it is advantageous or not to have high or low levels of MBL is not known. Likewise, it is not clear how the modifications induced by GH affect immune function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP).
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Endocrinology
Volume150
Issue3
Pages (from-to)355-62
Number of pages8
ISSN0804-4643
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Child
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Estradiol
  • Estrogen Replacement Therapy
  • Female
  • Haptoglobins
  • Human Growth Hormone
  • Humans
  • Mannose-Binding Lectin
  • Middle Aged
  • Norethindrone
  • Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D
  • Transferrin
  • Turner Syndrome
  • Vitamin D-Binding Protein

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