The Effect of a Mind-Body Intervention on Mental Health and Coping Self-Efficacy in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Feasibility Study

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The Effect of a Mind-Body Intervention on Mental Health and Coping Self-Efficacy in HIV-Infected Individuals : A Feasibility Study. / Rodkjaer, Lotte Oerneborg; Laursen, Tinne; Seeberg, Kirsten; Drouin, Marc; Johansen, Heinrich; Dyrehave, Charlotte; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen.

In: Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, 01.05.2017.

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@article{eeeff4a331b84d61a6f624b48c4c089e,
title = "The Effect of a Mind-Body Intervention on Mental Health and Coping Self-Efficacy in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Feasibility Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a stressful disease, and depression is the most common form of psychologic distress experienced by those infected. The aim of this study was to further develop and validate a mind-body intervention to improve coping self-efficacy strategies and increase mental health.DESIGN: Feasibility study, a randomized trial. Participants were assigned into two blocks (female/male) and simple randomization in a 1:1 ratio was performed within each block to one of two arms (1) intervention group, (2) control group who received usual care. Setting/Location and Subjects: The authors enrolled 30 HIV-infected individuals (10 women and 20 men) who had psychologic challenges and were motivated for working with personal development at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.INTERVENTION: The intervention was a group intervention facilitated by an educated coach. The framework was a 3-day residential course plus two single-day/8-h follow-up events. The intervention was based primarily on a Native American philosophy of life and its understanding of how changes affect human beings and create imbalance.OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcomes were change in risk of depression and level of coping self-efficacy. Secondary outcomes were change in levels of stress and personal growth.RESULTS: Significant improvement between the intervention group and control group was seen in risk of depression and personal growth mean values from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements were shown within the intervention group in mean values of risk of depression, coping self-efficacy, stress, and personal growth. There were no significant improvements within the control group.CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that interventions designed to increase resilience through enhancing coping self-efficacy be used in conjunction with HIV medication to make this approach and especially the {"}whole-person{"} commitment a fully integrated aspect of HIV care.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Rodkjaer, {Lotte Oerneborg} and Tinne Laursen and Kirsten Seeberg and Marc Drouin and Heinrich Johansen and Charlotte Dyrehave and H{\o}nge, {Bo Langhoff} and {\O}stergaard, {Lars J{\o}rgen}",
year = "2017",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/acm.2016.0251",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine",
issn = "1075-5535",
publisher = "Mary AnnLiebert, Inc. Publishers",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of a Mind-Body Intervention on Mental Health and Coping Self-Efficacy in HIV-Infected Individuals

T2 - A Feasibility Study

AU - Rodkjaer, Lotte Oerneborg

AU - Laursen, Tinne

AU - Seeberg, Kirsten

AU - Drouin, Marc

AU - Johansen, Heinrich

AU - Dyrehave, Charlotte

AU - Hønge, Bo Langhoff

AU - Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a stressful disease, and depression is the most common form of psychologic distress experienced by those infected. The aim of this study was to further develop and validate a mind-body intervention to improve coping self-efficacy strategies and increase mental health.DESIGN: Feasibility study, a randomized trial. Participants were assigned into two blocks (female/male) and simple randomization in a 1:1 ratio was performed within each block to one of two arms (1) intervention group, (2) control group who received usual care. Setting/Location and Subjects: The authors enrolled 30 HIV-infected individuals (10 women and 20 men) who had psychologic challenges and were motivated for working with personal development at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.INTERVENTION: The intervention was a group intervention facilitated by an educated coach. The framework was a 3-day residential course plus two single-day/8-h follow-up events. The intervention was based primarily on a Native American philosophy of life and its understanding of how changes affect human beings and create imbalance.OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcomes were change in risk of depression and level of coping self-efficacy. Secondary outcomes were change in levels of stress and personal growth.RESULTS: Significant improvement between the intervention group and control group was seen in risk of depression and personal growth mean values from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements were shown within the intervention group in mean values of risk of depression, coping self-efficacy, stress, and personal growth. There were no significant improvements within the control group.CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that interventions designed to increase resilience through enhancing coping self-efficacy be used in conjunction with HIV medication to make this approach and especially the "whole-person" commitment a fully integrated aspect of HIV care.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a stressful disease, and depression is the most common form of psychologic distress experienced by those infected. The aim of this study was to further develop and validate a mind-body intervention to improve coping self-efficacy strategies and increase mental health.DESIGN: Feasibility study, a randomized trial. Participants were assigned into two blocks (female/male) and simple randomization in a 1:1 ratio was performed within each block to one of two arms (1) intervention group, (2) control group who received usual care. Setting/Location and Subjects: The authors enrolled 30 HIV-infected individuals (10 women and 20 men) who had psychologic challenges and were motivated for working with personal development at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.INTERVENTION: The intervention was a group intervention facilitated by an educated coach. The framework was a 3-day residential course plus two single-day/8-h follow-up events. The intervention was based primarily on a Native American philosophy of life and its understanding of how changes affect human beings and create imbalance.OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcomes were change in risk of depression and level of coping self-efficacy. Secondary outcomes were change in levels of stress and personal growth.RESULTS: Significant improvement between the intervention group and control group was seen in risk of depression and personal growth mean values from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Significant improvements were shown within the intervention group in mean values of risk of depression, coping self-efficacy, stress, and personal growth. There were no significant improvements within the control group.CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that interventions designed to increase resilience through enhancing coping self-efficacy be used in conjunction with HIV medication to make this approach and especially the "whole-person" commitment a fully integrated aspect of HIV care.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1089/acm.2016.0251

DO - 10.1089/acm.2016.0251

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28384006

JO - Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine

JF - Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine

SN - 1075-5535

ER -