The dynamics of resting fluctuations in the brain: metastability and its dynamical cortical core

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  • Gustavo Deco, Center for Brain and Cognition, Computational Neuroscience Group, Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Roc Boronat 138, Barcelona 08018, Spain; Institució Catalana de la Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, Barcelona 08010, Spain; Department of Neuropsychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia.
  • ,
  • Morten L Kringelbach
  • Viktor K Jirsa, Aix Marseille Univ, INSERM, INS, Inst Neurosci Syst, Marseille, France.
  • ,
  • Petra Ritter, Department of Neurology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Germany.

In the human brain, spontaneous activity during resting state consists of rapid transitions between functional network states over time but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. We use connectome based computational brain network modeling to reveal fundamental principles of how the human brain generates large-scale activity observable by noninvasive neuroimaging. We used structural and functional neuroimaging data to construct whole- brain models. With this novel approach, we reveal that the human brain during resting state operates at maximum metastability, i.e. in a state of maximum network switching. In addition, we investigate cortical heterogeneity across areas. Optimization of the spectral characteristics of each local brain region revealed the dynamical cortical core of the human brain, which is driving the activity of the rest of the whole brain. Brain network modelling goes beyond correlational neuroimaging analysis and reveals non-trivial network mechanisms underlying non-invasive observations. Our novel findings significantly pertain to the important role of computational connectomics in understanding principles of brain function.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue1
Pages (from-to)3095
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jun 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

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