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The Danish health care system and epidemiological research: from health care contacts to database records

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The Danish health care system and epidemiological research: from health care contacts to database records. / Schmidt, Morten; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Adelborg, Kasper; Sundbøll, Jens; Laugesen, Kristina; Ehrenstein, Vera; Sørensen, Henrik Toft.

In: Clinical epidemiology, Vol. 11, 2019, p. 563-591.

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@article{a0186b9eab07437d92d96ba2130895eb,
title = "The Danish health care system and epidemiological research: from health care contacts to database records",
abstract = "Denmark has a large network of population-based medical databases, which routinely collect high-quality data as a by-product of health care provision. The Danish medical databases include administrative, health, and clinical quality databases. Understanding the full research potential of these data sources requires insight into the underlying health care system. This review describes key elements of the Danish health care system from planning and delivery to record generation. First, it presents the history of the health care system, its overall organization and financing. Second, it details delivery of primary, hospital, psychiatric, and elderly care. Third, the path from a health care contact to a database record is followed. Finally, an overview of the available data sources is presented. This review discusses the data quality of each type of medical database and describes the relative technical ease and cost-effectiveness of exact individual-level linkage among them. It is shown, from an epidemiological point of view, how Denmark's population represents an open dynamic cohort with complete long-term follow-up, censored only at emigration or death. It is concluded that Denmark's constellation of universal health care, long-standing routine registration of most health and life events, and the possibility of exact individual-level data linkage provides unlimited possibilities for epidemiological research.",
author = "Morten Schmidt and Schmidt, {Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir} and Kasper Adelborg and Jens Sundb{\o}ll and Kristina Laugesen and Vera Ehrenstein and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik Toft}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.2147/CLEP.S179083",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "563--591",
journal = "Clinical Epidemiology",
issn = "1179-1349",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.(Dovepress)",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Danish health care system and epidemiological research: from health care contacts to database records

AU - Schmidt, Morten

AU - Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir

AU - Adelborg, Kasper

AU - Sundbøll, Jens

AU - Laugesen, Kristina

AU - Ehrenstein, Vera

AU - Sørensen, Henrik Toft

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Denmark has a large network of population-based medical databases, which routinely collect high-quality data as a by-product of health care provision. The Danish medical databases include administrative, health, and clinical quality databases. Understanding the full research potential of these data sources requires insight into the underlying health care system. This review describes key elements of the Danish health care system from planning and delivery to record generation. First, it presents the history of the health care system, its overall organization and financing. Second, it details delivery of primary, hospital, psychiatric, and elderly care. Third, the path from a health care contact to a database record is followed. Finally, an overview of the available data sources is presented. This review discusses the data quality of each type of medical database and describes the relative technical ease and cost-effectiveness of exact individual-level linkage among them. It is shown, from an epidemiological point of view, how Denmark's population represents an open dynamic cohort with complete long-term follow-up, censored only at emigration or death. It is concluded that Denmark's constellation of universal health care, long-standing routine registration of most health and life events, and the possibility of exact individual-level data linkage provides unlimited possibilities for epidemiological research.

AB - Denmark has a large network of population-based medical databases, which routinely collect high-quality data as a by-product of health care provision. The Danish medical databases include administrative, health, and clinical quality databases. Understanding the full research potential of these data sources requires insight into the underlying health care system. This review describes key elements of the Danish health care system from planning and delivery to record generation. First, it presents the history of the health care system, its overall organization and financing. Second, it details delivery of primary, hospital, psychiatric, and elderly care. Third, the path from a health care contact to a database record is followed. Finally, an overview of the available data sources is presented. This review discusses the data quality of each type of medical database and describes the relative technical ease and cost-effectiveness of exact individual-level linkage among them. It is shown, from an epidemiological point of view, how Denmark's population represents an open dynamic cohort with complete long-term follow-up, censored only at emigration or death. It is concluded that Denmark's constellation of universal health care, long-standing routine registration of most health and life events, and the possibility of exact individual-level data linkage provides unlimited possibilities for epidemiological research.

U2 - 10.2147/CLEP.S179083

DO - 10.2147/CLEP.S179083

M3 - Review

C2 - 31372058

VL - 11

SP - 563

EP - 591

JO - Clinical Epidemiology

JF - Clinical Epidemiology

SN - 1179-1349

ER -