Department of Management

The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Standard

The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. / Pedersen, Susanne; Sniethotta, Falko; Sainsbury, Kirby; Evans, Elizabeth; Marques, Martha; Stubbs, James; Heitmann, Berit; Lähteenmäki, Liisa.

2018. Abstract from ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, China.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Pedersen, S, Sniethotta, F, Sainsbury, K, Evans, E, Marques, M, Stubbs, J, Heitmann, B & Lähteenmäki, L 2018, 'The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers', ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, China, 03/06/2018 - 06/06/2018.

APA

Pedersen, S., Sniethotta, F., Sainsbury, K., Evans, E., Marques, M., Stubbs, J., ... Lähteenmäki, L. (2018). The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. Abstract from ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, China.

CBE

Pedersen S, Sniethotta F, Sainsbury K, Evans E, Marques M, Stubbs J, Heitmann B, Lähteenmäki L. 2018. The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. Abstract from ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, China.

MLA

Pedersen, Susanne et al. The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, 03 Jun 2018, Hong Kong, China, Conference abstract for conference, 2018.

Vancouver

Pedersen S, Sniethotta F, Sainsbury K, Evans E, Marques M, Stubbs J et al. The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. 2018. Abstract from ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, China.

Author

Pedersen, Susanne ; Sniethotta, Falko ; Sainsbury, Kirby ; Evans, Elizabeth ; Marques, Martha ; Stubbs, James ; Heitmann, Berit ; Lähteenmäki, Liisa. / The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. Abstract from ISBNPA 2018: International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity, Hong Kong, China.

Bibtex

@conference{ab9e404ff5d644a698f8f07557b48f24,
title = "The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand whether self-regulation of food intake in WLM differs in the challenging transition from being a short-term maintainer (having maintained without regaining less than 12 months) to a long-term maintainer (having maintained without regaining more than 12 months) is under-researched. Food intake was viewed as an outcome of a complex set of food-related behaviours including planning, shopping/storing, preparing/cooking, eating and dealing with barriers. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was used as a conceptual framework to help describe and understand the self-regulatory strategies related to food intake in WLM. Methods: Individual interviews (14 female/5 male) were conducted with 9 Danish short- and 10 long-term weight loss maintainers. Initial codes were based on five themes related to food intake: planning, shopping/storing, preparing/cooking, eating, and general barriers and resources in WLM. Post-hoc coding was applied based on self-regulation strategies and self-efficacy beliefs, and thematic analysis was also applied to identify additional themes. A content analysis approach using NVivo 11 highlighted the differences between short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. Results:Self-regulatory strategies and self-efficacy beliefs varied between the food-related behaviours and between short- and long-term maintainers. With repeated use of action and coping planning, long-term maintainers had formed habitual routines, allowing more flexibility and improvisation in the behaviours related to WLM such as buying and storing food, and eating at social gatherings. The short-term maintainers often displayed a weight loss mind-set, focusing on the avoidance of certain behaviours (e.g., buying specific foods), showed less self-regulatory flexibility, more detailed action planning, but their interviews also inferred having ambitions for building strong WLM-habits, maintenance and recovery self-efficacy. Conclusions:The contribution of the study is that by applying a more holistic view on food intake as an outcome of a set of complex behaviours, insights into the difficult individual transition required from short- to long-term weight loss maintenance can be revealed. The transition process is clearly not a “one size fits all”-process, but a learning process that needs to be tailored to fit each individual’s life.",
author = "Susanne Pedersen and Falko Sniethotta and Kirby Sainsbury and Elizabeth Evans and Martha Marques and James Stubbs and Berit Heitmann and Liisa L{\"a}hteenm{\"a}ki",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "29",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 03-06-2018 Through 06-06-2018",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - The complexity of self-regulating food intake in weight loss maintenance. A qualitative exploration among short- and long-term weight loss maintainers

AU - Pedersen, Susanne

AU - Sniethotta, Falko

AU - Sainsbury, Kirby

AU - Evans, Elizabeth

AU - Marques, Martha

AU - Stubbs, James

AU - Heitmann, Berit

AU - Lähteenmäki, Liisa

PY - 2018/5/29

Y1 - 2018/5/29

N2 - Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand whether self-regulation of food intake in WLM differs in the challenging transition from being a short-term maintainer (having maintained without regaining less than 12 months) to a long-term maintainer (having maintained without regaining more than 12 months) is under-researched. Food intake was viewed as an outcome of a complex set of food-related behaviours including planning, shopping/storing, preparing/cooking, eating and dealing with barriers. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was used as a conceptual framework to help describe and understand the self-regulatory strategies related to food intake in WLM. Methods: Individual interviews (14 female/5 male) were conducted with 9 Danish short- and 10 long-term weight loss maintainers. Initial codes were based on five themes related to food intake: planning, shopping/storing, preparing/cooking, eating, and general barriers and resources in WLM. Post-hoc coding was applied based on self-regulation strategies and self-efficacy beliefs, and thematic analysis was also applied to identify additional themes. A content analysis approach using NVivo 11 highlighted the differences between short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. Results:Self-regulatory strategies and self-efficacy beliefs varied between the food-related behaviours and between short- and long-term maintainers. With repeated use of action and coping planning, long-term maintainers had formed habitual routines, allowing more flexibility and improvisation in the behaviours related to WLM such as buying and storing food, and eating at social gatherings. The short-term maintainers often displayed a weight loss mind-set, focusing on the avoidance of certain behaviours (e.g., buying specific foods), showed less self-regulatory flexibility, more detailed action planning, but their interviews also inferred having ambitions for building strong WLM-habits, maintenance and recovery self-efficacy. Conclusions:The contribution of the study is that by applying a more holistic view on food intake as an outcome of a set of complex behaviours, insights into the difficult individual transition required from short- to long-term weight loss maintenance can be revealed. The transition process is clearly not a “one size fits all”-process, but a learning process that needs to be tailored to fit each individual’s life.

AB - Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand whether self-regulation of food intake in WLM differs in the challenging transition from being a short-term maintainer (having maintained without regaining less than 12 months) to a long-term maintainer (having maintained without regaining more than 12 months) is under-researched. Food intake was viewed as an outcome of a complex set of food-related behaviours including planning, shopping/storing, preparing/cooking, eating and dealing with barriers. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) was used as a conceptual framework to help describe and understand the self-regulatory strategies related to food intake in WLM. Methods: Individual interviews (14 female/5 male) were conducted with 9 Danish short- and 10 long-term weight loss maintainers. Initial codes were based on five themes related to food intake: planning, shopping/storing, preparing/cooking, eating, and general barriers and resources in WLM. Post-hoc coding was applied based on self-regulation strategies and self-efficacy beliefs, and thematic analysis was also applied to identify additional themes. A content analysis approach using NVivo 11 highlighted the differences between short- and long-term weight loss maintainers. Results:Self-regulatory strategies and self-efficacy beliefs varied between the food-related behaviours and between short- and long-term maintainers. With repeated use of action and coping planning, long-term maintainers had formed habitual routines, allowing more flexibility and improvisation in the behaviours related to WLM such as buying and storing food, and eating at social gatherings. The short-term maintainers often displayed a weight loss mind-set, focusing on the avoidance of certain behaviours (e.g., buying specific foods), showed less self-regulatory flexibility, more detailed action planning, but their interviews also inferred having ambitions for building strong WLM-habits, maintenance and recovery self-efficacy. Conclusions:The contribution of the study is that by applying a more holistic view on food intake as an outcome of a set of complex behaviours, insights into the difficult individual transition required from short- to long-term weight loss maintenance can be revealed. The transition process is clearly not a “one size fits all”-process, but a learning process that needs to be tailored to fit each individual’s life.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -