Department of Economics and Business Economics

The associations between psychotic experiences, and substance use and substance use disorders: Findings from the World Health Organisation World Mental Health Surveys

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Louisa Degenhardt, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
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  • Sukanta Saha, Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The Park Centre for Mental Health, Wacol, Australia; Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Services, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: shuichi.suetani@health.qld.gov.au.
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  • Carmen C W Lim, Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The Park Centre for Mental Health, Wacol, Australia; Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Services, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: shuichi.suetani@health.qld.gov.au.
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  • Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, Center for Reducing Health Disparities, UC Davis Health System, Sacramento, California, USA.
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  • Ali Al-Hamzawi, College of Medicine, Al-Qadisiya University, Diwaniya governorate, Iraq.
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  • Jordi Alonso, Navarre Public Health Institute (ISPN), Pamplona, Spain CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain.
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  • Laura H Andrade, Núcleo de Epidemiologia Psiquiátrica - LIM 23, Instituto de Psiquiatria Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo.
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  • Evelyn J Bromet, Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York, USA.
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  • Ronny Bruffaerts, Campus Gasthuisberg, Universitair Psychiatrisch Centrum - Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (UPC-KUL), Leuven, Belgium.
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  • José M Caldas-de-Almeida, Lisbon Institute of Global Mental Health and Chronic Diseases Research Center (CEDOC), NOVA Medical School, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
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  • Giovanni de Girolamo, Unit of Epidemiological and Evaluation Psychiatry, Istituti di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS)-St. John of God Clinical Research Centre, Via Pilastroni 4, Brescia, Italy.
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  • Silvia Florescu, National School of Public Health, Management and Professional Development, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Oye Gureje, Department of Psychiatry, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.
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  • Josep M Haro, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
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  • Elie G Karam, Institute for Development Research Advocacy and Applied Care (IDRAAC), Beirut, Lebanon.
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  • Georges Karam, Institute for Development Research Advocacy and Applied Care (IDRAAC), Beirut, Lebanon.
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  • Viviane Kovess-Masfety, EHESP Dpt MéTis Epidémiologie et biostatistiques pour la décision en santé publique /Laboratoire Psychopathologie et Processus de Santé (EA 4057) Université Paris Descartes, EHESP School for Public Health ; Dpt Health Epidemiology and biostatistics for decision making in public health / EA 4057 Paris Descartes University.
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  • Sing Lee, Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Tai Po, Hong Kong.
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  • Jean-Pierre Lepine, Hôpital Lariboisière-Fernand Widal, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Universités Paris Descartes-Paris Diderot, INSERM UMR-S 1144, Paris, France.
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  • Victor Makanjuola, Department of Psychiatry, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.
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  • Maria E Medina-Mora, National Institute of Psychiatry Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz, Mexico City, Mexico.
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  • Zeina Mneimneh, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104, USA.
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  • Fernando Navarro-Mateu, UDIF-SM, Subdirección General de Planificación, Innovación y Cronicidad, Servicio Murciano de Salud. IMIB-Arrixaca. CIBERESP-Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
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  • Marina Piazza, National Institute of Health, Lima, Peru.
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  • José Posada-Villa, Faculty of Social Sciences, Colegio Mayor de Cundinamarca University, Bogota, Colombia.
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  • Nancy A Sampson, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
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  • Kate M Scott, Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand.
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  • Juan C Stagnaro, Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
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  • Margreet Ten Have, Trimbos-Instituut, Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, Netherlands.
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  • Kenneth S Kendler, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
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  • Ronald C Kessler, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
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  • John J McGrath
  • WHO World Mental Health Survey Collaborators

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Prior research has found bidirectional associations between psychotic experiences (PEs), and selected substance use disorders. We aimed to extend this research by examining the bidirectional association between PEs, and various types of substance use (SU), and substance use disorders (SUDs), and the influence of antecedent mental disorders on these associations.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: We used data from the World Health Organisation World Mental Health surveys. A total of 30,902 adult respondents across 18 countries were assessed for (a) six types of lifetime PEs, (b) a range of types of SU and DSM-IV SUDs, and (c) mental disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Discrete-time survival analyses based on retrospective age-at-onset reports examined the bidirectional associations between PEs and SU/SUDs controlling for antecedent mental disorders.

FINDINGS: After adjusting for demographics, comorbid SU/SUDs and antecedent mental disorders, those with prior alcohol use disorders (OR=1.6, 95% CI=1.2-2.0), extra-medical prescription drug use (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-1.9), alcohol use (OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.1-1.7), and tobacco use (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.0-1.8) had increased odds of subsequent first onset of PEs. In contrast, those with temporally prior PEs had increased odds of subsequent onset of tobacco use (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.2-1.9), alcohol use (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.1-1.6) or cannabis use (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.0-1.5) as well as of all substance use disorders (ORs ranged between 1.4 and 1.5). There was a dose response relationship between both count and frequency of PEs and increased subsequent odds of selected SU/SUDs.

CONCLUSIONS: Associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and substance use/substance use disorders (SU/SUDs) are often bidirectional, but not all types of SU/SUDs are associated with PEs. These findings suggest that it is important to be aware of the presence of PEs within those with SUDs or at risk of SUDs, given the plausibility that they may each impact upon the other.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAddiction
Volume113
Issue5
Pages (from-to)924-934
ISSN0965-2140
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

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