Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

The amusic brain: in tune, out of key, and unaware

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

The amusic brain : in tune, out of key, and unaware. / Peretz, Isabelle; Brattico, Elvira; Jarvenpaa, Miika; Tervaniemi, Mari.

In: Brain, Vol. 132, 05.2009, p. 1277-1286.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Peretz, I, Brattico, E, Jarvenpaa, M & Tervaniemi, M 2009, 'The amusic brain: in tune, out of key, and unaware', Brain, vol. 132, pp. 1277-1286. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp055

APA

Peretz, I., Brattico, E., Jarvenpaa, M., & Tervaniemi, M. (2009). The amusic brain: in tune, out of key, and unaware. Brain, 132, 1277-1286. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp055

CBE

Peretz I, Brattico E, Jarvenpaa M, Tervaniemi M. 2009. The amusic brain: in tune, out of key, and unaware. Brain. 132:1277-1286. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp055

MLA

Vancouver

Peretz I, Brattico E, Jarvenpaa M, Tervaniemi M. The amusic brain: in tune, out of key, and unaware. Brain. 2009 May;132:1277-1286. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp055

Author

Peretz, Isabelle ; Brattico, Elvira ; Jarvenpaa, Miika ; Tervaniemi, Mari. / The amusic brain : in tune, out of key, and unaware. In: Brain. 2009 ; Vol. 132. pp. 1277-1286.

Bibtex

@article{a82bc6783c6b46f9a7c7c41819f7e717,
title = "The amusic brain: in tune, out of key, and unaware",
abstract = "Like language, music engagement is universal, complex and present early in life. However, 4 of the general population experiences a lifelong deficit in music perception that cannot be explained by hearing loss, brain damage, intellectual deficiencies or lack of exposure. This musical disorder, commonly known as tone-deafness and now termed congenital amusia, affects mostly the melodic pitch dimension. Congenital amusia is hereditary and is associated with abnormal grey and white matter in the auditory cortex and the inferior frontal cortex. In order to relate these anatomical anomalies to the behavioural expression of the disorder, we measured the electrical brain activity of amusic subjects and matched controls while they monitored melodies for the presence of pitch anomalies. Contrary to current reports, we show that the amusic brain can track quarter-tone pitch differences, exhibiting an early right-lateralized negative brain response. This suggests near-normal neural processing of musical pitch incongruities in congenital amusia. It is important because it reveals that the amusic brain is equipped with the essential neural circuitry to perceive fine-grained pitch differences. What distinguishes the amusic from the normal brain is the limited awareness of this ability and the lack of responsiveness to the semitone changes that violate musical keys. These findings suggest that, in the amusic brain, the neural pitch representation cannot make contact with musical pitch knowledge along the auditory-frontal neural pathway.",
keywords = "congenital amusia, conscious awareness, pitch perception, auditory ERPs, melodies, HUMAN AUDITORY-CORTEX, CONGENITAL AMUSIA, IMPLICIT PERCEPTION, MUSICAL DISORDERS, TONE-DEAFNESS, REPRESENTATION, REGULARITIES, FREQUENCY, GENETICS, EXPLICIT",
author = "Isabelle Peretz and Elvira Brattico and Miika Jarvenpaa and Mari Tervaniemi",
year = "2009",
month = may,
doi = "10.1093/brain/awp055",
language = "English",
volume = "132",
pages = "1277--1286",
journal = "Brain",
issn = "0006-8950",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The amusic brain

T2 - in tune, out of key, and unaware

AU - Peretz, Isabelle

AU - Brattico, Elvira

AU - Jarvenpaa, Miika

AU - Tervaniemi, Mari

PY - 2009/5

Y1 - 2009/5

N2 - Like language, music engagement is universal, complex and present early in life. However, 4 of the general population experiences a lifelong deficit in music perception that cannot be explained by hearing loss, brain damage, intellectual deficiencies or lack of exposure. This musical disorder, commonly known as tone-deafness and now termed congenital amusia, affects mostly the melodic pitch dimension. Congenital amusia is hereditary and is associated with abnormal grey and white matter in the auditory cortex and the inferior frontal cortex. In order to relate these anatomical anomalies to the behavioural expression of the disorder, we measured the electrical brain activity of amusic subjects and matched controls while they monitored melodies for the presence of pitch anomalies. Contrary to current reports, we show that the amusic brain can track quarter-tone pitch differences, exhibiting an early right-lateralized negative brain response. This suggests near-normal neural processing of musical pitch incongruities in congenital amusia. It is important because it reveals that the amusic brain is equipped with the essential neural circuitry to perceive fine-grained pitch differences. What distinguishes the amusic from the normal brain is the limited awareness of this ability and the lack of responsiveness to the semitone changes that violate musical keys. These findings suggest that, in the amusic brain, the neural pitch representation cannot make contact with musical pitch knowledge along the auditory-frontal neural pathway.

AB - Like language, music engagement is universal, complex and present early in life. However, 4 of the general population experiences a lifelong deficit in music perception that cannot be explained by hearing loss, brain damage, intellectual deficiencies or lack of exposure. This musical disorder, commonly known as tone-deafness and now termed congenital amusia, affects mostly the melodic pitch dimension. Congenital amusia is hereditary and is associated with abnormal grey and white matter in the auditory cortex and the inferior frontal cortex. In order to relate these anatomical anomalies to the behavioural expression of the disorder, we measured the electrical brain activity of amusic subjects and matched controls while they monitored melodies for the presence of pitch anomalies. Contrary to current reports, we show that the amusic brain can track quarter-tone pitch differences, exhibiting an early right-lateralized negative brain response. This suggests near-normal neural processing of musical pitch incongruities in congenital amusia. It is important because it reveals that the amusic brain is equipped with the essential neural circuitry to perceive fine-grained pitch differences. What distinguishes the amusic from the normal brain is the limited awareness of this ability and the lack of responsiveness to the semitone changes that violate musical keys. These findings suggest that, in the amusic brain, the neural pitch representation cannot make contact with musical pitch knowledge along the auditory-frontal neural pathway.

KW - congenital amusia

KW - conscious awareness

KW - pitch perception

KW - auditory ERPs

KW - melodies

KW - HUMAN AUDITORY-CORTEX

KW - CONGENITAL AMUSIA

KW - IMPLICIT PERCEPTION

KW - MUSICAL DISORDERS

KW - TONE-DEAFNESS

KW - REPRESENTATION

KW - REGULARITIES

KW - FREQUENCY

KW - GENETICS

KW - EXPLICIT

U2 - 10.1093/brain/awp055

DO - 10.1093/brain/awp055

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19336462

VL - 132

SP - 1277

EP - 1286

JO - Brain

JF - Brain

SN - 0006-8950

ER -