Department of Management

The Abercrombie & Fitch effect: The impact of physical dominance on male customers’ status-signaling consumption

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The Abercrombie & Fitch effect : The impact of physical dominance on male customers’ status-signaling consumption. / Otterbring, Tobias; Ringler, Christine; Sirianni, Nancy J.; Gustafsson, Anders.

In: Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 55, No. 1, 2018, p. 69-79.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Otterbring, T, Ringler, C, Sirianni, NJ & Gustafsson, A 2018, 'The Abercrombie & Fitch effect: The impact of physical dominance on male customers’ status-signaling consumption', Journal of Marketing Research, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 69-79. https://doi.org/10.1509/jmr.15.0247

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MLA

Vancouver

Author

Otterbring, Tobias ; Ringler, Christine ; Sirianni, Nancy J. ; Gustafsson, Anders. / The Abercrombie & Fitch effect : The impact of physical dominance on male customers’ status-signaling consumption. In: Journal of Marketing Research. 2018 ; Vol. 55, No. 1. pp. 69-79.

Bibtex

@article{4728dc8be3054eabbe16cb282f201cba,
title = "The Abercrombie & Fitch effect: The impact of physical dominance on male customers’ status-signaling consumption",
abstract = "Consumer lay theory suggests that women will spend more money than men in the presence of a physically dominant male employee, whereas theories of intrasexual competition from evolutionary psychology predict the opposite outcome. A retail field study demonstrates that male customers spend more money and purchase more expensive products than their female counterparts in the presence (vs. absence) of a physically dominant male employee. This effect has a more powerful impact on male customers who lack bodily markers of dominance (shorter stature or measures linked to lower levels of testosterone). When confronted with other physically dominant (vs. nondominant) men, these male customers are particularly prone to signal status through price or logo size. Their elevated feelings of intrasexual (male-tomale) competitiveness drive them to spend more money on status-signaling, but not functional, products and to prefer and draw larger brand logos. Because pictorial exposure is sufficient for the effect to occur, these findings are not limited to in-store interactions with dominant male employees but have broad implications for marketing and advertising.",
keywords = "2D:4D digit ratio, 4TH DIGIT RATIO, BEHAVIOR, CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION, EVOLUTION, HYPOTHESIS, MEN, POWER, SELF, SEXUAL SELECTION, WOMEN, evolutionary psychology, field study, physical dominance, status-signaling consumption",
author = "Tobias Otterbring and Christine Ringler and Sirianni, {Nancy J.} and Anders Gustafsson",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1509/jmr.15.0247",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "69--79",
journal = "Journal of Marketing Research",
issn = "0022-2437",
publisher = "American Marketing Association",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Abercrombie & Fitch effect

T2 - The impact of physical dominance on male customers’ status-signaling consumption

AU - Otterbring, Tobias

AU - Ringler, Christine

AU - Sirianni, Nancy J.

AU - Gustafsson, Anders

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Consumer lay theory suggests that women will spend more money than men in the presence of a physically dominant male employee, whereas theories of intrasexual competition from evolutionary psychology predict the opposite outcome. A retail field study demonstrates that male customers spend more money and purchase more expensive products than their female counterparts in the presence (vs. absence) of a physically dominant male employee. This effect has a more powerful impact on male customers who lack bodily markers of dominance (shorter stature or measures linked to lower levels of testosterone). When confronted with other physically dominant (vs. nondominant) men, these male customers are particularly prone to signal status through price or logo size. Their elevated feelings of intrasexual (male-tomale) competitiveness drive them to spend more money on status-signaling, but not functional, products and to prefer and draw larger brand logos. Because pictorial exposure is sufficient for the effect to occur, these findings are not limited to in-store interactions with dominant male employees but have broad implications for marketing and advertising.

AB - Consumer lay theory suggests that women will spend more money than men in the presence of a physically dominant male employee, whereas theories of intrasexual competition from evolutionary psychology predict the opposite outcome. A retail field study demonstrates that male customers spend more money and purchase more expensive products than their female counterparts in the presence (vs. absence) of a physically dominant male employee. This effect has a more powerful impact on male customers who lack bodily markers of dominance (shorter stature or measures linked to lower levels of testosterone). When confronted with other physically dominant (vs. nondominant) men, these male customers are particularly prone to signal status through price or logo size. Their elevated feelings of intrasexual (male-tomale) competitiveness drive them to spend more money on status-signaling, but not functional, products and to prefer and draw larger brand logos. Because pictorial exposure is sufficient for the effect to occur, these findings are not limited to in-store interactions with dominant male employees but have broad implications for marketing and advertising.

KW - 2D:4D digit ratio

KW - 4TH DIGIT RATIO

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - HYPOTHESIS

KW - MEN

KW - POWER

KW - SELF

KW - SEXUAL SELECTION

KW - WOMEN

KW - evolutionary psychology

KW - field study

KW - physical dominance

KW - status-signaling consumption

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046815723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1509/jmr.15.0247

DO - 10.1509/jmr.15.0247

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 69

EP - 79

JO - Journal of Marketing Research

JF - Journal of Marketing Research

SN - 0022-2437

IS - 1

ER -