Temporal changes in incidence of hospital-diagnosed acute pyelonephritis: A 19-year population-based Danish cohort study

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine temporal changes in the incidence of hospital-diagnosed acute pyelonephritis (APN) and characterize associated demographics. Methods: Cohort study including Danish patients with hospital-diagnosed APN during 2000-2018, identified by International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes. Annual sex- and age-standardized incidence rates per 10,000 person years with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were stratified by sex, age group, diagnosis code, and region of residence. Incidence rates for selected urinary tract infections and sepsis diagnoses were also computed. Results: We included 66,937 hospital-diagnosed APN episodes in 57,162 patients. From 2000 to 2018, the incidence increased from 6.8 (95% CI: 6.8-6.8) to 15.4 (95% CI: 15.4-15.4) in women and from 2.7 (95% CI: 2.7-2.7) to 4.5 (95% CI: 4.5-4.5) in men. Among infants, the rate rose from 7.4 (95% CI: 7.4-7.4) to 64.8 (95% CI: 64.7-64.9) in girls and from 17.1 (95% CI: 17.1-17.2) to 52.5 (95% CI: 52.4-52.6) in boys. Concomitant declines were observed in incidences of hospital-diagnosed unspecified urinary tract infections and sepsis. Conclusion: The APN incidence roughly doubled during 2000-2018. The increase was largely driven by a prominently increasing incidence among young children which was not explained by the enlarging prevalence of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

Original languageEnglish
JournalIJID Regions
Volume9
Pages (from-to)104-110
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • Epidemiology
  • Hospitalization
  • Incidence
  • Pyelonephritis
  • Urinary tract infections

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