Suicide and prescription rates of intranasal corticosteroids and nonsedating antihistamines for allergic rhinitis: an ecological study

Jong-Min Woo, Robert D Gibbons, Ping Qin, Hirsh Komarow, Jong Bae Kim, Christine A Rogers, J John Mann, Teodor T Postolache

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

To estimate the relationship between antiallergy drug prescription rates and suicide across the United States and over time. The relationship between allergy, allergens, and suicidal behavior and suggestions of a possible immune mediation led us to hypothesize that intranasal corticosteroids, known to reduce local airway production of T-helper cell type 2 cytokines, may be associated with reduced risk of suicide relative to antihistamines, which only secondarily affect cytokine production.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume72
Issue10
Pages (from-to)1423-1428
Number of pages6
ISSN0160-6689
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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