Social Sensations of Symptoms: Embodied Socialities of HIV and Trauma in Uganda

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Social Sensations of Symptoms : Embodied Socialities of HIV and Trauma in Uganda. / Meinert, Lotte; Whyte, Susan Reynolds.

In: Anthropology in Action, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2017, p. 20-26.

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Meinert, Lotte ; Whyte, Susan Reynolds. / Social Sensations of Symptoms : Embodied Socialities of HIV and Trauma in Uganda. In: Anthropology in Action. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 20-26.

Bibtex

@article{f4dec4d3f0074da5aa6a61e424a6bc3f,
title = "Social Sensations of Symptoms: Embodied Socialities of HIV and Trauma in Uganda",
abstract = "The interpretation of sensations and the recognition of symptoms of a sickness, as well as the movement to seek treatment, have long been recognized in medical anthropology as inherently social processes. Based on cases of HIV and trauma (PTSD) in Uganda, we show that even the first signs and sensations of sickness can be radically social. The sensing body can be a {\textquoteleft}social body{\textquoteright} – a family, a couple, a network – a unit that transcends the individual body. In this article we focus on four aspects of the sociality of sensations and symptoms: mode of transmission; the shared experience of sensations/symptoms; differential recognition of symptoms; and the embodied sociality of treatment. ",
author = "Lotte Meinert and Whyte, {Susan Reynolds}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.3167/aia.2017.240104",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "20--26",
journal = "Anthropology in Action",
issn = "0967-201X",
publisher = "Berghahn Books Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Sensations of Symptoms

T2 - Embodied Socialities of HIV and Trauma in Uganda

AU - Meinert, Lotte

AU - Whyte, Susan Reynolds

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The interpretation of sensations and the recognition of symptoms of a sickness, as well as the movement to seek treatment, have long been recognized in medical anthropology as inherently social processes. Based on cases of HIV and trauma (PTSD) in Uganda, we show that even the first signs and sensations of sickness can be radically social. The sensing body can be a ‘social body’ – a family, a couple, a network – a unit that transcends the individual body. In this article we focus on four aspects of the sociality of sensations and symptoms: mode of transmission; the shared experience of sensations/symptoms; differential recognition of symptoms; and the embodied sociality of treatment.

AB - The interpretation of sensations and the recognition of symptoms of a sickness, as well as the movement to seek treatment, have long been recognized in medical anthropology as inherently social processes. Based on cases of HIV and trauma (PTSD) in Uganda, we show that even the first signs and sensations of sickness can be radically social. The sensing body can be a ‘social body’ – a family, a couple, a network – a unit that transcends the individual body. In this article we focus on four aspects of the sociality of sensations and symptoms: mode of transmission; the shared experience of sensations/symptoms; differential recognition of symptoms; and the embodied sociality of treatment.

U2 - 10.3167/aia.2017.240104

DO - 10.3167/aia.2017.240104

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 20

EP - 26

JO - Anthropology in Action

JF - Anthropology in Action

SN - 0967-201X

IS - 1

ER -