Sleep modulates effective connectivity: A study using intracranial stimulation and recording

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  • Anca Adriana Arbune, Department of Neurology, University Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Irina Popa, Department of Neurology, University Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Ioana Mindruta, Department of Neurology, University Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; Brain Research Group, Romanian Academy, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Sandor Beniczky
  • Cristian Donos, University of Bucharest, Physics Department, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Andrei Daneasa, University Emergency Hospital, Department of Neurology, Bucharest, Romania; University of Medicine and Pharmacy 'Carol Davila', Department of Neurology, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Mihai Dragoş Mălîia, University of Bucharest, Physics Department, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Ovidiu Alexandru Băjenaru, Department of Neurology, University Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania; Department of Clinical Neurosciences, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; Brain Research Group, Romanian Academy, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Jean Ciurea, Neurosurgery Department, Bagdasar-Arseni Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.
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  • Andrei Barborica, Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania; FHC Inc., Bowdoin, ME, United States. Electronic address: andrei.barborica@fizica.unibuc.ro.

OBJECTIVE: Sleep is an active process with an important role in memory. Epilepsy patients often display a disturbed sleep architecture, with consequences on cognition. We aimed to investigate the effect of sleep on cortical networks' organization.

METHODS: We analyzed cortico-cortical evoked responses elicited by single pulse electrical stimulation (SPES) using intracranial depth electrodes in 25 patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy explored using stereo-EEG. We applied the SPES protocol during wakefulness and NREM - N2 sleep. We analyzed 31,710 significant responses elicited by 799 stimulations covering most brain structures, epileptogenic or non-epileptogenic. We analyzed effective connectivity between structures using a graph-theory approach.

RESULTS: Sleep increases excitability in the brain, regardless of epileptogenicity. Local and distant connections are differently modulated by sleep, depending on the tissue epileptogenicity. In non-epileptogenic areas, frontal lobe connectivity is enhanced during sleep. There is increased connectivity between the hippocampus and temporal neocortex, while perisylvian structures are disconnected from the temporal lobe. In epileptogenic areas, we found a clear interhemispheric difference, with decreased connectivity in the right hemisphere during sleep.

CONCLUSIONS: Sleep modulates brain excitability and reconfigures functional brain networks, depending on tissue epileptogenicity.

SIGNIFICANCE: We found specific patterns of information flow during sleep in physiologic and pathologic structures, with possible implications for cognition.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume131
Issue2
Pages (from-to)529-541
Number of pages13
ISSN1388-2457
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

    Research areas

  • Effective connectivity, Epilepsy, Single pulse electrical stimulation, Sleep, stereo-EEG

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