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Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice

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Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice. / Livingstone-Lee, Sharon A; Murchison, Sonja; Zeman, Philip M; Gandhi, Mehul; van Gerven, Dustin; Stewart, Lauren; Livingston, Nigel J; Skelton, Ronald W.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 225, No. 1, 20.11.2011, p. 117-25.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Livingstone-Lee, SA, Murchison, S, Zeman, PM, Gandhi, M, van Gerven, D, Stewart, L, Livingston, NJ & Skelton, RW 2011, 'Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice', Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 225, no. 1, pp. 117-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005

APA

Livingstone-Lee, S. A., Murchison, S., Zeman, P. M., Gandhi, M., van Gerven, D., Stewart, L., Livingston, N. J., & Skelton, R. W. (2011). Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice. Behavioural Brain Research, 225(1), 117-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005

CBE

Livingstone-Lee SA, Murchison S, Zeman PM, Gandhi M, van Gerven D, Stewart L, Livingston NJ, Skelton RW. 2011. Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice. Behavioural Brain Research. 225(1):117-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005

MLA

Vancouver

Livingstone-Lee SA, Murchison S, Zeman PM, Gandhi M, van Gerven D, Stewart L et al. Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice. Behavioural Brain Research. 2011 Nov 20;225(1):117-25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005

Author

Livingstone-Lee, Sharon A ; Murchison, Sonja ; Zeman, Philip M ; Gandhi, Mehul ; van Gerven, Dustin ; Stewart, Lauren ; Livingston, Nigel J ; Skelton, Ronald W. / Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2011 ; Vol. 225, No. 1. pp. 117-25.

Bibtex

@article{77efcd7773db4369bd0401d56b9ed714,
title = "Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice",
abstract = "We present a novel method of combining eye tracking with specially designed virtual environments to provide objective evidence of navigational strategy selection. A simple, inexpensive video camera with an easily built infrared LED array is used to capture eye movements at 60Hz. Simple algorithms analyze gaze position at the start of each virtual maze trial to identify stimuli used for navigational orientation. To validate the methodology, human participants were tested in two virtual environments which differed with respect to features usable for navigation and which forced participants to use one or another of two well-known navigational strategies. Because the environmental features for the two kinds of navigation were clustered in different regions of the environment (and the video display), a simple analysis of gaze-position during the first (i.e., orienting) second of each trial revealed which features were being attended to, and therefore, which navigational strategy was about to be employed on the upcoming trial.",
keywords = "Choice Behavior, Cues, Female, Fixation, Ocular, Humans, Male, Maze Learning, Nonlinear Dynamics, Orientation, Space Perception, User-Computer Interface, Young Adult",
author = "Livingstone-Lee, {Sharon A} and Sonja Murchison and Zeman, {Philip M} and Mehul Gandhi and {van Gerven}, Dustin and Lauren Stewart and Livingston, {Nigel J} and Skelton, {Ronald W}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2011",
month = nov,
day = "20",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005",
language = "English",
volume = "225",
pages = "117--25",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Simple gaze analysis and special design of a virtual Morris water maze provides a new method for differentiating egocentric and allocentric navigational strategy choice

AU - Livingstone-Lee, Sharon A

AU - Murchison, Sonja

AU - Zeman, Philip M

AU - Gandhi, Mehul

AU - van Gerven, Dustin

AU - Stewart, Lauren

AU - Livingston, Nigel J

AU - Skelton, Ronald W

N1 - Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2011/11/20

Y1 - 2011/11/20

N2 - We present a novel method of combining eye tracking with specially designed virtual environments to provide objective evidence of navigational strategy selection. A simple, inexpensive video camera with an easily built infrared LED array is used to capture eye movements at 60Hz. Simple algorithms analyze gaze position at the start of each virtual maze trial to identify stimuli used for navigational orientation. To validate the methodology, human participants were tested in two virtual environments which differed with respect to features usable for navigation and which forced participants to use one or another of two well-known navigational strategies. Because the environmental features for the two kinds of navigation were clustered in different regions of the environment (and the video display), a simple analysis of gaze-position during the first (i.e., orienting) second of each trial revealed which features were being attended to, and therefore, which navigational strategy was about to be employed on the upcoming trial.

AB - We present a novel method of combining eye tracking with specially designed virtual environments to provide objective evidence of navigational strategy selection. A simple, inexpensive video camera with an easily built infrared LED array is used to capture eye movements at 60Hz. Simple algorithms analyze gaze position at the start of each virtual maze trial to identify stimuli used for navigational orientation. To validate the methodology, human participants were tested in two virtual environments which differed with respect to features usable for navigation and which forced participants to use one or another of two well-known navigational strategies. Because the environmental features for the two kinds of navigation were clustered in different regions of the environment (and the video display), a simple analysis of gaze-position during the first (i.e., orienting) second of each trial revealed which features were being attended to, and therefore, which navigational strategy was about to be employed on the upcoming trial.

KW - Choice Behavior

KW - Cues

KW - Female

KW - Fixation, Ocular

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Maze Learning

KW - Nonlinear Dynamics

KW - Orientation

KW - Space Perception

KW - User-Computer Interface

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005

DO - 10.1016/j.bbr.2011.07.005

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21771614

VL - 225

SP - 117

EP - 125

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

IS - 1

ER -