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Self-surveillance: How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity

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Self-surveillance : How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity. / Albrechtslund, Anders.

2013. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S), San Diego, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

Albrechtslund, A. (2013). Self-surveillance: How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S), San Diego, United States.

CBE

Albrechtslund A. 2013. Self-surveillance: How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S), San Diego, United States.

MLA

Vancouver

Albrechtslund A. Self-surveillance: How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity. 2013. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S), San Diego, United States.

Author

Albrechtslund, Anders. / Self-surveillance : How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S), San Diego, United States.

Bibtex

@conference{ccaf59c78ad9413bb85eecb9995613a7,
title = "Self-surveillance: How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity",
abstract = "Gadgets and applications are increasingly being developed and used for tracking, quantifying, and documenting everyday life activities and especially health and fitness devices such as GPS-enabled sports watches are well-known and popular. However, self-surveillance practices involving networked technologies can be found across many domains, including culture, food, learning, work and general living. Individuals use tools and techniques to track themselves, thereby translating their own habits, bodies, moods, and thoughts into objects to scrutinize and transform. In addition, self-tracking is often coupled with social interaction and sometimes framed as entertainment or games. Facilitated by online community and social networking sites, the possibility of collecting and sharing data is a significant feature of these self-monitoring technologies. They all include sharing features where weight, blood pressure, fitness activities, sleep cycles, etc. can be broadcasted, e.g. as tweets on Twitter or status updates on Facebook. Such quantification practices with monitoring technologies become co-producing when individuals constitute themselves as subjects engaging in self-tracking, self-care, and self-governance.The paper is guided by the following research questions: How does the translation of self into a quantifiable object produce subjectivity (as patient, athlete, learner, worker, etc.)? What role do potentially fragile technologies play in the mediation of the self? How do social interaction, entertainment, and gamification modulate the enactment of selfhood? How does self-surveillance contribute to corresponding notions of self-optimization and self-cultivation such as “the good life”, “sustainable lifestyle”, “healthy living”, “good learning” and “work productivity”?",
keywords = "overv{\aa}gning, surveillance",
author = "Anders Albrechtslund",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 09-10-2013 Through 12-10-2013",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - Self-surveillance

T2 - How Quantification Practices and Monitoring Technologies Produce Subjectivity

AU - Albrechtslund, Anders

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Gadgets and applications are increasingly being developed and used for tracking, quantifying, and documenting everyday life activities and especially health and fitness devices such as GPS-enabled sports watches are well-known and popular. However, self-surveillance practices involving networked technologies can be found across many domains, including culture, food, learning, work and general living. Individuals use tools and techniques to track themselves, thereby translating their own habits, bodies, moods, and thoughts into objects to scrutinize and transform. In addition, self-tracking is often coupled with social interaction and sometimes framed as entertainment or games. Facilitated by online community and social networking sites, the possibility of collecting and sharing data is a significant feature of these self-monitoring technologies. They all include sharing features where weight, blood pressure, fitness activities, sleep cycles, etc. can be broadcasted, e.g. as tweets on Twitter or status updates on Facebook. Such quantification practices with monitoring technologies become co-producing when individuals constitute themselves as subjects engaging in self-tracking, self-care, and self-governance.The paper is guided by the following research questions: How does the translation of self into a quantifiable object produce subjectivity (as patient, athlete, learner, worker, etc.)? What role do potentially fragile technologies play in the mediation of the self? How do social interaction, entertainment, and gamification modulate the enactment of selfhood? How does self-surveillance contribute to corresponding notions of self-optimization and self-cultivation such as “the good life”, “sustainable lifestyle”, “healthy living”, “good learning” and “work productivity”?

AB - Gadgets and applications are increasingly being developed and used for tracking, quantifying, and documenting everyday life activities and especially health and fitness devices such as GPS-enabled sports watches are well-known and popular. However, self-surveillance practices involving networked technologies can be found across many domains, including culture, food, learning, work and general living. Individuals use tools and techniques to track themselves, thereby translating their own habits, bodies, moods, and thoughts into objects to scrutinize and transform. In addition, self-tracking is often coupled with social interaction and sometimes framed as entertainment or games. Facilitated by online community and social networking sites, the possibility of collecting and sharing data is a significant feature of these self-monitoring technologies. They all include sharing features where weight, blood pressure, fitness activities, sleep cycles, etc. can be broadcasted, e.g. as tweets on Twitter or status updates on Facebook. Such quantification practices with monitoring technologies become co-producing when individuals constitute themselves as subjects engaging in self-tracking, self-care, and self-governance.The paper is guided by the following research questions: How does the translation of self into a quantifiable object produce subjectivity (as patient, athlete, learner, worker, etc.)? What role do potentially fragile technologies play in the mediation of the self? How do social interaction, entertainment, and gamification modulate the enactment of selfhood? How does self-surveillance contribute to corresponding notions of self-optimization and self-cultivation such as “the good life”, “sustainable lifestyle”, “healthy living”, “good learning” and “work productivity”?

KW - overvågning

KW - surveillance

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -