Risk of dementia and cognitive dysfunction in individuals with diabetes or elevated blood glucose

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  • I K Wium-Andersen, Center for Clinical Research and Disease Prevention, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark., Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Department, O, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Denmark
  • J Rungby
  • M B Jørgensen, Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Department, O, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • ,
  • A Sandbæk
  • M Osler, Center for Clinical Research and Disease Prevention, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark., Professor, Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; and Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology,University of Copenhagen,Denmark.
  • ,
  • M K Wium-Andersen, Center for Clinical Research and Disease Prevention, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark., Denmark

AIMS: To determine the risk of dementia in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and in individuals with glycosylated haemoglobin, type A1C (HbA1c) of ⩾48 mmol/mol, which is the diagnostic limit for diabetes.

METHODS: We included the following cohorts: all incident diabetes cases aged 15 or above registered in the National Diabetes Registry (NDR) from January 2000 through December 2012 (n = 148 036) and a reference population, adult participants from the Glostrup cohort (n = 16 801), the ADDITION Study (n = 26 586) and Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) (n = 5408). Using these cohorts, we analysed if a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes in the NDR or HbA1c level of ⩾ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) in the cohorts increased risk of dementia in the Danish National Patient Registry or cognitive performance assessed by the Intelligenz-Struktur-Test 2000R (IST2000R).

RESULTS: A diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes in the NDR was associated with increased risk of dementia diagnosed both before or after age 65 as well as across different subtypes of dementia. Self-reported diabetes or high HbA1c levels were associated with lower cognitive performance (p = 0.004), while high HbA1c was associated with increased risk of dementia (HR 1.94 (1.10-3.44) in the Glostrup cohort but not in the ADDITION Study (HR 0.96 (0.57-1.61)).

CONCLUSIONS: Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk of dementia, while the importance of screening-detected elevated HbA1c remains less clear.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere43
JournalEpidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Volume29
Number of pages9
ISSN2045-7960
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Research areas

  • cognition, dementia, diabetes, dysglycemia, HbA1c

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