Revealing the history of domesticated sheep using retrovirus integrations

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Bernado Chessa, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • Filipe Pereira, Instituto de Patologia e Imunologia Molecular da Universidade do Porto (IPATIMUP), Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Portugal
  • Frederick Arnaud, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • Antonio Amorim, Instituto de Patologia e Imunologia Molecular da Universidade do Porto (IPATIMUP), Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Portugal
  • Félix Goyache, Área de Genética y Reproducción Animal, SERIDA-Somió, Spain
  • Ingrid Mainland, Division of Archaelogical, Geographical and Environmental Sciences, University of Bradford, United Kingdom
  • Rowland R Kao, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • Josephine M Pemberton, Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Dario Beraldi, Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Michael J Stear, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • Alberto Alberti, Dipartimento di Patologia e Clinica Veterinaria, Universita’ degli Studi di Sassari, Italy
  • Marco Pittau, Dipartimento di Patologia e Clinica Veterinaria, Universita’ degli Studi di Sassari, Italy
  • Leopoldo Iannuzzi, National Research Council (CNR), ISPAAM, Italy
  • Mohammad H Banabazi, Department of Biotechnology, Animal Science Research Institute of Iran, Iran, Islamic Republic of
  • Rudovick R Kazwala, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Public Health, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogor, Tanzania, United Republic of
  • Ya-ping Zhang, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Juan J Arranz, Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Veterinária, Universidad de León, Spain
  • Bahy A Ali, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Egypt
  • Zhiliang Wang, National Diagnostic Center for Exotic Animal Diseases, China Animal Health and Epidemiology Centers, China
  • Metehan Uzun, School of Health Science, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey
  • Michel M Dione, International Trypanotolerance Centre, Gambia
  • Ingrid Olsaker, Department of Basic Sciences and Aquatic Medicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Norway
  • Lars-Erik Holm
  • Urmas Saarma, Department of Zoology, Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Estonia
  • Sohail Ahmad, NWFP Agricultural University, Pakistan
  • Nurbiy Marzanov, All-Russian Research Institute of Animal Husbandry, Russian Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Russian Federation
  • Emma Eythorsdottir, Agricultural University of Iceland, Iceland
  • Martin J Holland, Medical Research Council Laboratories, Gambia
  • Paolo Ajmone-Marsan, Istituto di Zootecnica, Universita’ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy
  • Michael W Bruford, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, United Kingdom
  • Juha Kantanen, Biotechnology and Food Research, MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Finland
  • Thomas E Spencer, Center for Animal Biotechnology and Genomics, Texas A&M University, United States
  • Massimo Palmarini, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • Molekylær Genetik og Systembiologi
  • Department of Genetics and Biotechnology
The domestication of livestock represented a crucial step in human history. By using endogenous retroviruses as genetic markers, we found that sheep differentiated on the basis of their "retrotype" and morphological traits dispersed across Eurasia and Africa via separate migratory episodes. Relicts of the first migrations include the Mouflon, as well as breeds previously recognized as "primitive" on the basis of their morphology, such as the Orkney, Soay, and the Nordic short-tailed sheep now confined to the periphery of northwest Europe. A later migratory episode, involving sheep with improved production traits, shaped the great majority of present-day breeds. The ability to differentiate genetically primitive sheep from more modern breeds provides valuable insights into the history of sheep domestication
Original languageEnglish
JournalScience
Volume324
Issue5926
Pages (from-to)532-536
Number of pages5
ISSN0036-8075
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2009

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