Report of RILEM TC 281-CCC: effect of loading on the carbonation performance of concrete with supplementary cementitious materials — an interlaboratory comparison of different test methods and related observations

Yan Yao*, Ling Wang, Juan Li, Nele De Belie, Xinyu Shi, Philip Van den Heede, Cheng Zhang, Zhiyuan Liu, Visalakshi Talakokula, Zuquan Jin, Chuansheng Xiong, Jingzhou Lu, Siham Kamali-Bernard, Tushar Bansal, Bin Li, Zhendi Wang, Yu Huang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Durability of concrete with supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) is crucial to the longevity of our built environment. Current research on the carbonation performance of concrete focuses on determining changes in microstructure induced by the chemical and physical interactions of CO2 with the cement phase in samples that do not undergo loading. Although this approach has enabled us to understand the chemical carbonation durability of concrete, the deterioration process is certainly not realistic considering the in-service conditions of structural concrete. Therefore, five different laboratories from RILEM TC 281-CCC WG4 conducted comparative testing of Portland cement concrete with/without SCMs under the combined action of carbonation and mechanical loading. The results indicated that the carbonation depth of concrete undergoing mechanical loading is lower in the case of a limited compressive load, and higher in the case of a high compressive load or tensile load, compared with unloaded specimens. The relative carbonation depth was decreased by 9–16% at 30% of the failure load in compression, independent of CO2 concentration and the presence of SCMs, while it was increased up to 13% at a 60% load level at most. Tension made the carbonation depth gradually increase, and up to 70% higher carbonation depth was reached at 60% of the tensile failure load. The combined effect of carbonation in concrete with SCMs and mechanical loading should therefore not be neglected in the service life prediction of concrete structures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110
JournalMaterials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions
Volume56
Issue6
Number of pages13
ISSN1359-5997
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2023

Keywords

  • Combined actions
  • Compressive loading
  • Concrete carbonation
  • Durability
  • Supplementary cementitious materials
  • Tensile loading

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