Department of Economics and Business Economics

Psychotic experiences and religiosity: data from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • V. Kovess-Masfety, Université Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité
  • ,
  • S. Saha, Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, The University of Queensland
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  • C. C.W. Lim, The University of Queensland
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  • S. Aguilar-Gaxiola, UC Davis Health System
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  • A. Al-Hamzawi, Al-Qadisiya University
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  • J. Alonso, Hospital del Mar, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP)
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  • G. Borges, National Institute of Psychiatry Ramón de la Fuente
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  • G. de Girolamo, IRCCS Istituto Centro San Giovanni di Dio-Fatebenefratelli
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  • P. de Jonge, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen
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  • K. Demyttenaere, Dentistry, University Hospitals, KU Leuven
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  • S. Florescu, National School of Public Health, Management and Professional Development
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  • J. M. Haro, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
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  • C. Hu, Shenzhen Institute of Mental Health & Shenzhen Kangning Hospital
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  • E. G. Karam, Balamand University, St George Hospital University Medical Center, Institute for Development Research Advocacy and Applied Care (IDRAAC)
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  • N. Kawakami, University Tokyo
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  • S. Lee, Chinese University Hong Kong
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  • J. P. Lepine, Université Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité
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  • F. Navarro-Mateu, Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP)
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  • M. ten Have, Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction
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  • M. C. Viana, Espírito Santo
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  • R. C. Kessler, Harvard Medical School
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  • J. J. McGrath
  • the WHO World Mental Health Survey Collaborators

Objectives: Religiosity is often associated with better health outcomes. The aim of the study was to examine associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and religiosity in a large, cross-national sample. Methods: A total of 25 542 adult respondents across 18 countries from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys were assessed for PEs, religious affiliation and indices of religiosity, DSM-IV mental disorders and general medical conditions. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between PEs and religiosity with various adjustments. Results: Of 25 542 included respondents, 85.6% (SE = 0.3) (n = 21 860) respondents reported having a religious affiliation. Overall, there was no association between religious affiliation status and PEs. Within the subgroup having a religious affiliation, four of five indices of religiosity were significantly associated with increased odds of PEs (odds ratios ranged from 1.3 to 1.9). The findings persisted after adjustments for mental disorders and/or general medical conditions, as well as religious denomination type. There was a significant association between increased religiosity and reporting more types of PEs. Conclusions: Among individuals with religious affiliations, those who reported more religiosity on four of five indices had increased odds of PEs. Focussed and more qualitative research will be required to unravel the interrelationship between religiosity and PEs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume137
Issue4
Pages (from-to)306-315
Number of pages10
ISSN0001-690X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

    Research areas

  • epidemiology, psychotic experiences, religiosity, World Mental Health Survey, RESPONDENTS, SUBSTANCE USE, CROSS-NATIONAL ANALYSIS, SPIRITUALITY, COMORBIDITY, ORGANIZATION, HALLUCINATIONS, ADOLESCENTS, OUTCOMES, ASSOCIATION

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