Department of Economics and Business Economics

Postpartum psychiatric disorders

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

DOI

  • Samantha Meltzer-Brody, University of North Carolina (UNC) HIV Cure Center, UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
  • ,
  • Louise M Howard, King's College London
  • ,
  • Veerle Bergink, Department of Psychiatry and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY, USA.
  • ,
  • Simone Vigod, Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • ,
  • Ian Jones, National Centre for Mental Health, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Division of Psychological Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
  • ,
  • Trine Munk-Olsen
  • Simone Honikman, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • ,
  • Jeannette Milgrom, Parent-Infant Research Institute and University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Pregnancy is a complex and vulnerable period that presents a number of challenges to women, including the development of postpartum psychiatric disorders (PPDs). These disorders can include postpartum depression and anxiety, which are relatively common, and the rare but more severe postpartum psychosis. In addition, other PPDs can include obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and eating disorders. The aetiology of PPDs is a complex interaction of psychological, social and biological factors, in addition to genetic and environmental factors. The goals of treating postpartum mental illness are reducing maternal symptoms and supporting maternal-child and family functioning. Women and their families should receive psychoeducation about the illness, including evidence-based discussions about the risks and benefits of each treatment option. Developing effective strategies in global settings that allow the delivery of targeted therapies to women with different clinical phenotypes and severities of PPDs is essential.

Original languageEnglish
Article number18022
JournalNature reviews. Disease primers
Volume4
Number of pages18
ISSN2056-676X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2018

    Research areas

  • BIPOLAR DISORDER, COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY, INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE, MATERNAL DEPRESSION, MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES, MOTHER-INFANT RELATIONSHIP, PERINATAL MENTAL-HEALTH, POSTNATAL DEPRESSION SCALE, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL

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