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Political Participation Online: The Replacement and the Mobilisation Hypotheses Revisited

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Political Participation Online: The Replacement and the Mobilisation Hypotheses Revisited. / Jensen, Jakob Linaa.

In: Scandinavian Political Studies, 2013.

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@article{6666722b6c2b45e4b37c93193c3e8d55,
title = "Political Participation Online: The Replacement and the Mobilisation Hypotheses Revisited",
abstract = "This article discusses the state of political participation online more than ten years after theInternet’s great popular breakthrough as an everyday medium. Denmark is used as a casestudy to critically re-examine the frequently discussed replacement and mobilisation hypotheses on behalf of the Internet. The pure replacement hypothesis is rejected. Instead, it is foundthat the Internet still supplements rather than replaces other media, even among heavy Internet users. The Internet is one among several media used by ‘media omnivores’, and politicalparticipation online supplements rather than substitutes offline participation. More interesting,the mobilisation hypothesis is partly confirmed. Even though some online participation patterns resemble traditional ones, it seems as if the Internet finally is starting to mobilise youngergenerations. Further, traditional predictors behind political participation, efficacy and socialcapital seem to have less impact on online political participation. In the end, these findings arerelated to more overall discussions on the democratising potential of the Internet.",
author = "Jensen, {Jakob Linaa}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1111/1467-9477.12008",
language = "English",
journal = "Scandinavian Political Studies",
issn = "0080-6757",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Political Participation Online: The Replacement and the Mobilisation Hypotheses Revisited

AU - Jensen, Jakob Linaa

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This article discusses the state of political participation online more than ten years after theInternet’s great popular breakthrough as an everyday medium. Denmark is used as a casestudy to critically re-examine the frequently discussed replacement and mobilisation hypotheses on behalf of the Internet. The pure replacement hypothesis is rejected. Instead, it is foundthat the Internet still supplements rather than replaces other media, even among heavy Internet users. The Internet is one among several media used by ‘media omnivores’, and politicalparticipation online supplements rather than substitutes offline participation. More interesting,the mobilisation hypothesis is partly confirmed. Even though some online participation patterns resemble traditional ones, it seems as if the Internet finally is starting to mobilise youngergenerations. Further, traditional predictors behind political participation, efficacy and socialcapital seem to have less impact on online political participation. In the end, these findings arerelated to more overall discussions on the democratising potential of the Internet.

AB - This article discusses the state of political participation online more than ten years after theInternet’s great popular breakthrough as an everyday medium. Denmark is used as a casestudy to critically re-examine the frequently discussed replacement and mobilisation hypotheses on behalf of the Internet. The pure replacement hypothesis is rejected. Instead, it is foundthat the Internet still supplements rather than replaces other media, even among heavy Internet users. The Internet is one among several media used by ‘media omnivores’, and politicalparticipation online supplements rather than substitutes offline participation. More interesting,the mobilisation hypothesis is partly confirmed. Even though some online participation patterns resemble traditional ones, it seems as if the Internet finally is starting to mobilise youngergenerations. Further, traditional predictors behind political participation, efficacy and socialcapital seem to have less impact on online political participation. In the end, these findings arerelated to more overall discussions on the democratising potential of the Internet.

U2 - 10.1111/1467-9477.12008

DO - 10.1111/1467-9477.12008

M3 - Journal article

JO - Scandinavian Political Studies

JF - Scandinavian Political Studies

SN - 0080-6757

ER -