Policy, Sport and Integration: The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Policy, Sport and Integration : The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs. / Agergaard, Sine; Sørensen, Jan Kahr.

In: International Journal of Sport Policy, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2010, p. 205-221.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Agergaard, S & Sørensen, JK 2010, 'Policy, Sport and Integration: The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs', International Journal of Sport Policy, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 205-221. https://doi.org/10.1080/19406940.2010.488067

APA

Agergaard, S., & Sørensen, J. K. (2010). Policy, Sport and Integration: The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs. International Journal of Sport Policy, 2(2), 205-221. https://doi.org/10.1080/19406940.2010.488067

CBE

MLA

Agergaard, Sine and Jan Kahr Sørensen. "Policy, Sport and Integration: The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs". International Journal of Sport Policy. 2010, 2(2). 205-221. https://doi.org/10.1080/19406940.2010.488067

Vancouver

Author

Agergaard, Sine ; Sørensen, Jan Kahr. / Policy, Sport and Integration : The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs. In: International Journal of Sport Policy. 2010 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 205-221.

Bibtex

@article{139e6ec4311e49e68c0bb7d69e8caf29,
title = "Policy, Sport and Integration: The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs",
abstract = "Increased public funding, more governmental involvement and an emphasis on the instrumental values of physical activities have in general become characteristic of Western nations’ policies towards sport. Denmark is, however, a little different in that there is still little political intervention in sport, although sports clubs do get economic support and are seen as having the potential to solve crucial social issues. The purpose of this article is to analyse and discuss the ways in which the political assumption that sport can enhance social integration is reflected in the practical governance of integration issues in particular in sports clubs. The article is based on a local field study in which weinterviewed 10 talented football players with ethnic minority backgrounds and eight coaches and club leaders from six different football clubs. Distinguishing between integration and assimilation, the analysis shows that coaches (and the Danish football governing bodies) employ a strategy of integration towards ethnic minority players’ different preferences for food and clothing. However, in the daily practice of football the clubs have an implicit strategy of assimilation. The coaches attempt to treat everyone the same (no matter the ethnicity and background of the players). Inspired by anthropological studies this is analysed as a common way to downplay differences between the members of a society (or in this case a football team and club) and to enhance instead an ‘imaginedsameness’ that is central to the national self-understanding in Nordic countries. This leads us to discuss a possible change of strategy for elite sports clubs to develop explicit policies for their work with ethnic minorities.",
keywords = "soccer, politics, youth, ethnicity, equality, Denmark",
author = "Sine Agergaard and S{\o}rensen, {Jan Kahr}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1080/19406940.2010.488067",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "205--221",
journal = "International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics",
issn = "1940-6940",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Policy, Sport and Integration

T2 - The case of talented ethnic minority players in Danish football clubs

AU - Agergaard, Sine

AU - Sørensen, Jan Kahr

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Increased public funding, more governmental involvement and an emphasis on the instrumental values of physical activities have in general become characteristic of Western nations’ policies towards sport. Denmark is, however, a little different in that there is still little political intervention in sport, although sports clubs do get economic support and are seen as having the potential to solve crucial social issues. The purpose of this article is to analyse and discuss the ways in which the political assumption that sport can enhance social integration is reflected in the practical governance of integration issues in particular in sports clubs. The article is based on a local field study in which weinterviewed 10 talented football players with ethnic minority backgrounds and eight coaches and club leaders from six different football clubs. Distinguishing between integration and assimilation, the analysis shows that coaches (and the Danish football governing bodies) employ a strategy of integration towards ethnic minority players’ different preferences for food and clothing. However, in the daily practice of football the clubs have an implicit strategy of assimilation. The coaches attempt to treat everyone the same (no matter the ethnicity and background of the players). Inspired by anthropological studies this is analysed as a common way to downplay differences between the members of a society (or in this case a football team and club) and to enhance instead an ‘imaginedsameness’ that is central to the national self-understanding in Nordic countries. This leads us to discuss a possible change of strategy for elite sports clubs to develop explicit policies for their work with ethnic minorities.

AB - Increased public funding, more governmental involvement and an emphasis on the instrumental values of physical activities have in general become characteristic of Western nations’ policies towards sport. Denmark is, however, a little different in that there is still little political intervention in sport, although sports clubs do get economic support and are seen as having the potential to solve crucial social issues. The purpose of this article is to analyse and discuss the ways in which the political assumption that sport can enhance social integration is reflected in the practical governance of integration issues in particular in sports clubs. The article is based on a local field study in which weinterviewed 10 talented football players with ethnic minority backgrounds and eight coaches and club leaders from six different football clubs. Distinguishing between integration and assimilation, the analysis shows that coaches (and the Danish football governing bodies) employ a strategy of integration towards ethnic minority players’ different preferences for food and clothing. However, in the daily practice of football the clubs have an implicit strategy of assimilation. The coaches attempt to treat everyone the same (no matter the ethnicity and background of the players). Inspired by anthropological studies this is analysed as a common way to downplay differences between the members of a society (or in this case a football team and club) and to enhance instead an ‘imaginedsameness’ that is central to the national self-understanding in Nordic countries. This leads us to discuss a possible change of strategy for elite sports clubs to develop explicit policies for their work with ethnic minorities.

KW - soccer

KW - politics

KW - youth

KW - ethnicity

KW - equality

KW - Denmark

U2 - 10.1080/19406940.2010.488067

DO - 10.1080/19406940.2010.488067

M3 - Journal article

VL - 2

SP - 205

EP - 221

JO - International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics

JF - International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics

SN - 1940-6940

IS - 2

ER -