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Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels

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Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels. / Thackeray, Stephen J.; Henrys, Peter; Hemming, Deborah; Bell, James R.; Botham, Marc S.; Burthe, Sarah; Helaouet, Pierre; Johns, David; Jones, Ian D.; Leech, David J.; Mackay, Eleanor B.; Massimino, Dario; Atkinson, Sian; Bacon, Philip J.; Brereton, Tom M.; Carvalho, Laurence; Clutton-Brock, Tim H.; Duck, Callan; Edwards, Martin; Elliott, J. Malcolm; Hall, Stephen J.G.; Harrington, Richard; Pearce-Higgins, James W.; Høye, Toke Thomas; Kruuk, Loeske E.B.; Pemberton, Josephine M; Sparks, Tim H.; Thompson, Paul M; White, Ian; Winfield, Ian J.; Wanless, Sarah.

In: Nature, Vol. 535, 2016, p. 241–245.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Thackeray, SJ, Henrys, P, Hemming, D, Bell, JR, Botham, MS, Burthe, S, Helaouet, P, Johns, D, Jones, ID, Leech, DJ, Mackay, EB, Massimino, D, Atkinson, S, Bacon, PJ, Brereton, TM, Carvalho, L, Clutton-Brock, TH, Duck, C, Edwards, M, Elliott, JM, Hall, SJG, Harrington, R, Pearce-Higgins, JW, Høye, TT, Kruuk, LEB, Pemberton, JM, Sparks, TH, Thompson, PM, White, I, Winfield, IJ & Wanless, S 2016, 'Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels', Nature, vol. 535, pp. 241–245. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18608

APA

Thackeray, S. J., Henrys, P., Hemming, D., Bell, J. R., Botham, M. S., Burthe, S., Helaouet, P., Johns, D., Jones, I. D., Leech, D. J., Mackay, E. B., Massimino, D., Atkinson, S., Bacon, P. J., Brereton, T. M., Carvalho, L., Clutton-Brock, T. H., Duck, C., Edwards, M., ... Wanless, S. (2016). Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels. Nature, 535, 241–245. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18608

CBE

Thackeray SJ, Henrys P, Hemming D, Bell JR, Botham MS, Burthe S, Helaouet P, Johns D, Jones ID, Leech DJ, Mackay EB, Massimino D, Atkinson S, Bacon PJ, Brereton TM, Carvalho L, Clutton-Brock TH, Duck C, Edwards M, Elliott JM, Hall SJG, Harrington R, Pearce-Higgins JW, Høye TT, Kruuk LEB, Pemberton JM, Sparks TH, Thompson PM, White I, Winfield IJ, Wanless S. 2016. Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels. Nature. 535:241–245. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18608

MLA

Vancouver

Thackeray SJ, Henrys P, Hemming D, Bell JR, Botham MS, Burthe S et al. Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels. Nature. 2016;535:241–245. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature18608

Author

Thackeray, Stephen J. ; Henrys, Peter ; Hemming, Deborah ; Bell, James R. ; Botham, Marc S. ; Burthe, Sarah ; Helaouet, Pierre ; Johns, David ; Jones, Ian D. ; Leech, David J. ; Mackay, Eleanor B. ; Massimino, Dario ; Atkinson, Sian ; Bacon, Philip J. ; Brereton, Tom M. ; Carvalho, Laurence ; Clutton-Brock, Tim H. ; Duck, Callan ; Edwards, Martin ; Elliott, J. Malcolm ; Hall, Stephen J.G. ; Harrington, Richard ; Pearce-Higgins, James W. ; Høye, Toke Thomas ; Kruuk, Loeske E.B. ; Pemberton, Josephine M ; Sparks, Tim H. ; Thompson, Paul M ; White, Ian ; Winfield, Ian J. ; Wanless, Sarah. / Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels. In: Nature. 2016 ; Vol. 535. pp. 241–245.

Bibtex

@article{f10bb938525941118a93abbdd4674340,
title = "Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels",
abstract = "Differences in phenological responses to climate change among species can desynchronise ecological interactions and thereby threaten ecosystem function. To assess these threats, we must quantify the relative impact of climate change on species at different trophic levels. Here, we apply a Climate Sensitivity Profile approach to 10,003 terrestrial and aquatic phenological data sets, spatially matched to temperature and precipitation data, to quantify variation in climate sensitivity. The direction, magnitude and timing of climate sensitivity varied markedly among organisms within taxonomic and trophic groups. Despite this variability, we detected systematic variation in the direction and magnitude of phenological climate sensitivity. Secondary consumers showed consistently lower climate sensitivity than other groups. We used mid-century climate change projections to estimate that the timing of phenological events could change more for primary consumers than for species in other trophic levels (6.2 versus 2.5–2.9 days earlier on average), with substantial taxonomic variation (1.1–14.8 days earlier on average).",
author = "Thackeray, {Stephen J.} and Peter Henrys and Deborah Hemming and Bell, {James R.} and Botham, {Marc S.} and Sarah Burthe and Pierre Helaouet and David Johns and Jones, {Ian D.} and Leech, {David J.} and Mackay, {Eleanor B.} and Dario Massimino and Sian Atkinson and Bacon, {Philip J.} and Brereton, {Tom M.} and Laurence Carvalho and Clutton-Brock, {Tim H.} and Callan Duck and Martin Edwards and Elliott, {J. Malcolm} and Hall, {Stephen J.G.} and Richard Harrington and Pearce-Higgins, {James W.} and H{\o}ye, {Toke Thomas} and Kruuk, {Loeske E.B.} and Pemberton, {Josephine M} and Sparks, {Tim H.} and Thompson, {Paul M} and Ian White and Winfield, {Ian J.} and Sarah Wanless",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1038/nature18608",
language = "English",
volume = "535",
pages = "241–245",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels

AU - Thackeray, Stephen J.

AU - Henrys, Peter

AU - Hemming, Deborah

AU - Bell, James R.

AU - Botham, Marc S.

AU - Burthe, Sarah

AU - Helaouet, Pierre

AU - Johns, David

AU - Jones, Ian D.

AU - Leech, David J.

AU - Mackay, Eleanor B.

AU - Massimino, Dario

AU - Atkinson, Sian

AU - Bacon, Philip J.

AU - Brereton, Tom M.

AU - Carvalho, Laurence

AU - Clutton-Brock, Tim H.

AU - Duck, Callan

AU - Edwards, Martin

AU - Elliott, J. Malcolm

AU - Hall, Stephen J.G.

AU - Harrington, Richard

AU - Pearce-Higgins, James W.

AU - Høye, Toke Thomas

AU - Kruuk, Loeske E.B.

AU - Pemberton, Josephine M

AU - Sparks, Tim H.

AU - Thompson, Paul M

AU - White, Ian

AU - Winfield, Ian J.

AU - Wanless, Sarah

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Differences in phenological responses to climate change among species can desynchronise ecological interactions and thereby threaten ecosystem function. To assess these threats, we must quantify the relative impact of climate change on species at different trophic levels. Here, we apply a Climate Sensitivity Profile approach to 10,003 terrestrial and aquatic phenological data sets, spatially matched to temperature and precipitation data, to quantify variation in climate sensitivity. The direction, magnitude and timing of climate sensitivity varied markedly among organisms within taxonomic and trophic groups. Despite this variability, we detected systematic variation in the direction and magnitude of phenological climate sensitivity. Secondary consumers showed consistently lower climate sensitivity than other groups. We used mid-century climate change projections to estimate that the timing of phenological events could change more for primary consumers than for species in other trophic levels (6.2 versus 2.5–2.9 days earlier on average), with substantial taxonomic variation (1.1–14.8 days earlier on average).

AB - Differences in phenological responses to climate change among species can desynchronise ecological interactions and thereby threaten ecosystem function. To assess these threats, we must quantify the relative impact of climate change on species at different trophic levels. Here, we apply a Climate Sensitivity Profile approach to 10,003 terrestrial and aquatic phenological data sets, spatially matched to temperature and precipitation data, to quantify variation in climate sensitivity. The direction, magnitude and timing of climate sensitivity varied markedly among organisms within taxonomic and trophic groups. Despite this variability, we detected systematic variation in the direction and magnitude of phenological climate sensitivity. Secondary consumers showed consistently lower climate sensitivity than other groups. We used mid-century climate change projections to estimate that the timing of phenological events could change more for primary consumers than for species in other trophic levels (6.2 versus 2.5–2.9 days earlier on average), with substantial taxonomic variation (1.1–14.8 days earlier on average).

U2 - 10.1038/nature18608

DO - 10.1038/nature18608

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27362222

VL - 535

SP - 241

EP - 245

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

ER -