Oxytocin improves synchronisation in leader-follower interaction

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Oxytocin improves synchronisation in leader-follower interaction. / Gebauer, Line; Witek, Maria; Hansen, Niels Christian; Thomas, Jana; Konvalinka, Ivana; Vuust, Peter.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 38416, 2016.

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Gebauer, Line ; Witek, Maria ; Hansen, Niels Christian ; Thomas, Jana ; Konvalinka, Ivana ; Vuust, Peter. / Oxytocin improves synchronisation in leader-follower interaction. In: Scientific Reports. 2016 ; Vol. 6.

Bibtex

@article{2b4d1aa4c01d47098a39c92cc747ed91,
title = "Oxytocin improves synchronisation in leader-follower interaction",
abstract = "The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to affect social interaction. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism remains highly debated. Using an interpersonal finger-tapping paradigm, we investigated whether oxytocin affects the ability to synchronise with and adapt to the behaviour of others. Dyads received either oxytocin or a non-active placebo, intranasally. We show that in conditions where one dyad-member was tapping to another unresponsive dyad member – i.e. one was following another who was leading/self-pacing – dyads given oxytocin were more synchronised than dyads given placebo. However, there was no effect when following a regular metronome or when both tappers were mutually adapting to each other. Furthermore, relative to their self-paced tapping partners, oxytocin followers were less variable than placebo followers. Our data suggests that oxytocin improves synchronisation to an unresponsive partner{\textquoteright}s behaviour through a reduction in tapping-variability. Hence, oxytocinc may facilitate social interaction by enhancing sensorimotor predictions supporting interpersonal synchronisation. The study thus provides novel perspectives on how neurobiological processes relate to socio-psychological behaviour and contributes to the growing evidence that synchronisation and prediction are central to social cognition.",
author = "Line Gebauer and Maria Witek and Hansen, {Niels Christian} and Jana Thomas and Ivana Konvalinka and Peter Vuust",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1038/srep38416",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxytocin improves synchronisation in leader-follower interaction

AU - Gebauer, Line

AU - Witek, Maria

AU - Hansen, Niels Christian

AU - Thomas, Jana

AU - Konvalinka, Ivana

AU - Vuust, Peter

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to affect social interaction. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism remains highly debated. Using an interpersonal finger-tapping paradigm, we investigated whether oxytocin affects the ability to synchronise with and adapt to the behaviour of others. Dyads received either oxytocin or a non-active placebo, intranasally. We show that in conditions where one dyad-member was tapping to another unresponsive dyad member – i.e. one was following another who was leading/self-pacing – dyads given oxytocin were more synchronised than dyads given placebo. However, there was no effect when following a regular metronome or when both tappers were mutually adapting to each other. Furthermore, relative to their self-paced tapping partners, oxytocin followers were less variable than placebo followers. Our data suggests that oxytocin improves synchronisation to an unresponsive partner’s behaviour through a reduction in tapping-variability. Hence, oxytocinc may facilitate social interaction by enhancing sensorimotor predictions supporting interpersonal synchronisation. The study thus provides novel perspectives on how neurobiological processes relate to socio-psychological behaviour and contributes to the growing evidence that synchronisation and prediction are central to social cognition.

AB - The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to affect social interaction. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism remains highly debated. Using an interpersonal finger-tapping paradigm, we investigated whether oxytocin affects the ability to synchronise with and adapt to the behaviour of others. Dyads received either oxytocin or a non-active placebo, intranasally. We show that in conditions where one dyad-member was tapping to another unresponsive dyad member – i.e. one was following another who was leading/self-pacing – dyads given oxytocin were more synchronised than dyads given placebo. However, there was no effect when following a regular metronome or when both tappers were mutually adapting to each other. Furthermore, relative to their self-paced tapping partners, oxytocin followers were less variable than placebo followers. Our data suggests that oxytocin improves synchronisation to an unresponsive partner’s behaviour through a reduction in tapping-variability. Hence, oxytocinc may facilitate social interaction by enhancing sensorimotor predictions supporting interpersonal synchronisation. The study thus provides novel perspectives on how neurobiological processes relate to socio-psychological behaviour and contributes to the growing evidence that synchronisation and prediction are central to social cognition.

U2 - 10.1038/srep38416

DO - 10.1038/srep38416

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27929100

VL - 6

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 38416

ER -