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Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home. / Pedro, Kirk; Grierson, Mick ; Bodak, Rebeka; Ward, Nick ; Brander, Fran ; Kelly, Kate ; Newman, Nicholas ; Stewart, Lauren.

Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. 2016. p. 1781-1785.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Pedro, K, Grierson, M, Bodak, R, Ward, N, Brander, F, Kelly, K, Newman, N & Stewart, L 2016, Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home. in Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. pp. 1781-1785, ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, San Jose, United States, 07/05/2016. https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858376

APA

Pedro, K., Grierson, M., Bodak, R., Ward, N., Brander, F., Kelly, K., Newman, N., & Stewart, L. (2016). Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home. In Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1781-1785) https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858376

CBE

Pedro K, Grierson M, Bodak R, Ward N, Brander F, Kelly K, Newman N, Stewart L. 2016. Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home. In Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. pp. 1781-1785. https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858376

MLA

Pedro, Kirk et al. "Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home". Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. 2016, 1781-1785. https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858376

Vancouver

Pedro K, Grierson M, Bodak R, Ward N, Brander F, Kelly K et al. Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home. In Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. 2016. p. 1781-1785 https://doi.org/10.1145/2858036.2858376

Author

Pedro, Kirk ; Grierson, Mick ; Bodak, Rebeka ; Ward, Nick ; Brander, Fran ; Kelly, Kate ; Newman, Nicholas ; Stewart, Lauren. / Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home. Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. 2016. pp. 1781-1785

Bibtex

@inproceedings{9248da49b3e0471da37642b5ea56d48a,
title = "Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home",
abstract = "Digital approaches to physical rehabilitation are becomingincreasingly common [14] and embedding these newtechnologies within a musical framework may beparticularly motivating [11,12]. The current feasibilitystudy aimed to test if digital musical instruments (DMIs)could aid in the self-management of stroke rehabilitation inthe home, focusing on seated forward reach movements ofthe upper limb. Participants (n=3), all at least 11 monthspost stroke, participated in 15 researcher-led music makingsessions over a 5 week intervention period. The sessionsinvolved them {\textquoteleft}drumming{\textquoteright} to the beat of self-chosen tunesusing bespoke digital drum pads that were syncedwirelessly to an iPad App and triggered percussion soundsas feedback. They were encouraged to continue theseexercises when the researcher was not present. The resultsshowed significant levels of self-management andsignificant increases in functional measures with someevidence for transfer into tasks of daily living.",
keywords = "Stroke Rehabilitation, Digital Musical Interfaces, Auditory Feedback, Self-management, Entrainment",
author = "Kirk Pedro and Mick Grierson and Rebeka Bodak and Nick Ward and Fran Brander and Kate Kelly and Nicholas Newman and Lauren Stewart",
year = "2016",
month = may,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1145/2858036.2858376",
language = "English",
pages = "1781--1785",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems",
note = "ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2016 ; Conference date: 07-05-2016 Through 12-05-2016",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Motivating stroke rehabilitation through music: A feasibility study using digital musical instruments in the home

AU - Pedro, Kirk

AU - Grierson, Mick

AU - Bodak, Rebeka

AU - Ward, Nick

AU - Brander, Fran

AU - Kelly, Kate

AU - Newman, Nicholas

AU - Stewart, Lauren

PY - 2016/5/7

Y1 - 2016/5/7

N2 - Digital approaches to physical rehabilitation are becomingincreasingly common [14] and embedding these newtechnologies within a musical framework may beparticularly motivating [11,12]. The current feasibilitystudy aimed to test if digital musical instruments (DMIs)could aid in the self-management of stroke rehabilitation inthe home, focusing on seated forward reach movements ofthe upper limb. Participants (n=3), all at least 11 monthspost stroke, participated in 15 researcher-led music makingsessions over a 5 week intervention period. The sessionsinvolved them ‘drumming’ to the beat of self-chosen tunesusing bespoke digital drum pads that were syncedwirelessly to an iPad App and triggered percussion soundsas feedback. They were encouraged to continue theseexercises when the researcher was not present. The resultsshowed significant levels of self-management andsignificant increases in functional measures with someevidence for transfer into tasks of daily living.

AB - Digital approaches to physical rehabilitation are becomingincreasingly common [14] and embedding these newtechnologies within a musical framework may beparticularly motivating [11,12]. The current feasibilitystudy aimed to test if digital musical instruments (DMIs)could aid in the self-management of stroke rehabilitation inthe home, focusing on seated forward reach movements ofthe upper limb. Participants (n=3), all at least 11 monthspost stroke, participated in 15 researcher-led music makingsessions over a 5 week intervention period. The sessionsinvolved them ‘drumming’ to the beat of self-chosen tunesusing bespoke digital drum pads that were syncedwirelessly to an iPad App and triggered percussion soundsas feedback. They were encouraged to continue theseexercises when the researcher was not present. The resultsshowed significant levels of self-management andsignificant increases in functional measures with someevidence for transfer into tasks of daily living.

KW - Stroke Rehabilitation

KW - Digital Musical Interfaces

KW - Auditory Feedback

KW - Self-management

KW - Entrainment

U2 - 10.1145/2858036.2858376

DO - 10.1145/2858036.2858376

M3 - Article in proceedings

SP - 1781

EP - 1785

BT - Proceedings of the 34th Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems

T2 - ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

Y2 - 7 May 2016 through 12 May 2016

ER -