Mitochondria in parasitic plants

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Standard

Mitochondria in parasitic plants. / Petersen, Gitte; Anderson, Benjamin; Braun, Hans Peter; Meyer, Etienne H.; Møller, Ian Max.

In: Mitochondrion, Vol. 52, 05.2020, p. 173-182.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Petersen, G, Anderson, B, Braun, HP, Meyer, EH & Møller, IM 2020, 'Mitochondria in parasitic plants', Mitochondrion, vol. 52, pp. 173-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

APA

Petersen, G., Anderson, B., Braun, H. P., Meyer, E. H., & Møller, I. M. (2020). Mitochondria in parasitic plants. Mitochondrion, 52, 173-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

CBE

Petersen G, Anderson B, Braun HP, Meyer EH, Møller IM. 2020. Mitochondria in parasitic plants. Mitochondrion. 52:173-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

MLA

Petersen, Gitte et al. "Mitochondria in parasitic plants". Mitochondrion. 2020, 52. 173-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

Vancouver

Petersen G, Anderson B, Braun HP, Meyer EH, Møller IM. Mitochondria in parasitic plants. Mitochondrion. 2020 May;52:173-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

Author

Petersen, Gitte ; Anderson, Benjamin ; Braun, Hans Peter ; Meyer, Etienne H. ; Møller, Ian Max. / Mitochondria in parasitic plants. In: Mitochondrion. 2020 ; Vol. 52. pp. 173-182.

Bibtex

@article{301cea4695c0459db825a660c417834a,
title = "Mitochondria in parasitic plants",
abstract = "Plant mitochondrial genomes are renowned for their structural complexity, extreme variation in size and mutation rates, and ability to incorporate foreign DNA. Parasitic flowering plants are no exception, and the close association between parasite and host may even enhance the likelihood of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between them. Recent studies on mistletoes (Viscum) have revealed that these parasites have lost an exceptional number of mitochondrial genes, including all complex I genes of the respiratory chain. At the same time, an altered respiratory pathway has been demonstrated. Here we review the current understanding of mitochondrial evolution in parasitic plants with a special emphasis on HGT to and from parasite mitochondrial genomes, as well as the uniquely altered mitochondria in Viscum and related plants.",
keywords = "Horizontal gene transfer, Mitochondrial complex I, Mitochondrial genome, OXPHOS, Parasitic plants, Plant mitochondria, Respiratory chain",
author = "Gitte Petersen and Benjamin Anderson and Braun, {Hans Peter} and Meyer, {Etienne H.} and M{\o}ller, {Ian Max}",
year = "2020",
month = may,
doi = "10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "173--182",
journal = "Mitochondrion",
issn = "1567-7249",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mitochondria in parasitic plants

AU - Petersen, Gitte

AU - Anderson, Benjamin

AU - Braun, Hans Peter

AU - Meyer, Etienne H.

AU - Møller, Ian Max

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - Plant mitochondrial genomes are renowned for their structural complexity, extreme variation in size and mutation rates, and ability to incorporate foreign DNA. Parasitic flowering plants are no exception, and the close association between parasite and host may even enhance the likelihood of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between them. Recent studies on mistletoes (Viscum) have revealed that these parasites have lost an exceptional number of mitochondrial genes, including all complex I genes of the respiratory chain. At the same time, an altered respiratory pathway has been demonstrated. Here we review the current understanding of mitochondrial evolution in parasitic plants with a special emphasis on HGT to and from parasite mitochondrial genomes, as well as the uniquely altered mitochondria in Viscum and related plants.

AB - Plant mitochondrial genomes are renowned for their structural complexity, extreme variation in size and mutation rates, and ability to incorporate foreign DNA. Parasitic flowering plants are no exception, and the close association between parasite and host may even enhance the likelihood of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between them. Recent studies on mistletoes (Viscum) have revealed that these parasites have lost an exceptional number of mitochondrial genes, including all complex I genes of the respiratory chain. At the same time, an altered respiratory pathway has been demonstrated. Here we review the current understanding of mitochondrial evolution in parasitic plants with a special emphasis on HGT to and from parasite mitochondrial genomes, as well as the uniquely altered mitochondria in Viscum and related plants.

KW - Horizontal gene transfer

KW - Mitochondrial complex I

KW - Mitochondrial genome

KW - OXPHOS

KW - Parasitic plants

KW - Plant mitochondria

KW - Respiratory chain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85082689008&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

DO - 10.1016/j.mito.2020.03.008

M3 - Review

C2 - 32224234

AN - SCOPUS:85082689008

VL - 52

SP - 173

EP - 182

JO - Mitochondrion

JF - Mitochondrion

SN - 1567-7249

ER -