Microbial anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation - Ecology, mechanisms and environmental implications

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

DOI

  • Casey Bryce, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Nia Blackwell, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Caroline Schmidt, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Julia Otte, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Yu-Ming Huang, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Sara Kleindienst, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Elizabeth Tomaszewski, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Manuel Schad, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Viola Warter, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Chao Peng, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • James M. Byrne, Univ Tubingen, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Ctr Appl Geosci, Geomicrobiol
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  • Andreas Kappler

Iron is the most abundant redox-active metal in the Earth's crust. The one electron transfer between the two most common redox states, Fe(II) and Fe(III), plays a role in a huge range of environmental processes from mineral formation and dissolution to contaminant remediation and global biogeochemical cycling. It has been appreciated for more than a century that microorganisms can harness the energy of this Fe redox transformation for their metabolic benefit. However, this is most widely understood for anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing or aerobic and microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Only in the past few decades have we come to appreciate that bacteria also play a role in the anaerobic oxidation of ferrous iron, Fe(II), and thus can act to form Fe(III) minerals in anoxic settings. Since this discovery, our understanding of the ecology of these organisms, their mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and their role in environmental processes has been increasing rapidly. In this article, we bring these new discoveries together to review the current knowledge on these environmentally important bacteria, and reveal knowledge gaps for future research.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume20
Issue10
Pages (from-to)3462-3483
Number of pages22
ISSN1462-2912
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

    Research areas

  • RHODOPSEUDOMONAS-PALUSTRIS TIE-1, NITRATE-REDUCING BACTERIA, FE(II)-OXIDIZING PHOTOAUTOTROPHIC BACTERIA, RHODOBACTER-CAPSULATUS SB1003, PERIODICALLY HYPOXIC ESTUARY, DEPENDENT IRON OXIDATION, NITROUS-OXIDE EMISSION, ACIDOVORAX SP BOFEN1, FERROOXIDANS SP NOV., FERROUS-IRON

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