Intercropping of Narrow-Leafed Lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) and Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Affects the Flavonoid Composition of Both Crops

Ida K.L. Andersen, Inge S. Fomsgaard*, Jim Rasmussen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is a common cereal crop in agricultural production and is often included in legume-cereal intercropping. Flavonoids, a major class of secondary metabolites found in barley, are involved in plant defense and protection. However, the effect of intercropping on barley flavonoids remains unknown. Herein, an intercropping system involving barley and lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) was studied. Intercropping increased the level of luteolin in lupin roots. Lupin-barley intercropping considerably increased genistein, rutin, and apigenin in barley shoots. Genistein and apigenin were also detected in intercropped barley roots and rhizosphere soil. The three flavonoids have been reported as defense compounds, suggesting that lupin triggers a defense response in barley to strengthen its survival ability.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume72
Issue1
Pages (from-to)108-115
Number of pages8
ISSN0021-8561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)
  • flavonoids
  • intercropping
  • lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.)
  • targeted metabolomics

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