Initial butyrate producers during infant gut microbiota development are endospore formers

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DOI

  • Olivia Appert, ETH Zürich
  • ,
  • Alejandro Ramirez Garcia, ETH Zürich
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  • Remo Frei, The Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-CARE), University of Bern
  • ,
  • Caroline Roduit, The Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-CARE), University Children’s Hospital Zurich, Children's Hospital St. Gallen
  • ,
  • Florentin Constancias, ETH Zürich
  • ,
  • Vera Neuzil-Bunesova, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
  • ,
  • Ruth Ferstl, The Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-CARE), University of Zurich
  • ,
  • Jianbo Zhang, ETH Zürich
  • ,
  • Cezmi Akdis, The Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-CARE), University of Zurich
  • ,
  • Roger Lauener, The Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-CARE), Children's Hospital St. Gallen
  • ,
  • Christophe Lacroix, ETH Zürich
  • ,
  • Clarissa Schwab

The acquisition of the infant gut microbiota is key to establishing a host-microbiota symbiosis. Microbially produced metabolites tightly interact with the immune system, and the fermentation-derived short-chain fatty acid butyrate is considered an important mediator linked to chronic diseases later in life. The intestinal butyrate-forming bacterial population is taxonomically and functionally diverse and includes endospore formers with high transmission potential. Succession, and contribution of butyrate-producing taxa during infant gut microbiota development have been little investigated. We determined the abundance of major butyrate-forming groups and fermentation metabolites in faeces, isolated, cultivated and characterized the heat-resistant cell population, which included endospores, and compared butyrate formation efficiency of representative taxa in batch cultures. The endospore community contributed about 0.001% to total cells, and was mainly composed of the pioneer butyrate-producingClostridiumsensu stricto. We observed an increase in abundance ofFaecalibacterium prausnitzii, butyrate-producingLachnospiraceaeand faecal butyrate levels with age that is likely explained by higher butyrate production capacity of contributing taxa compared withClostridiumsensu stricto. Our data suggest that a successional arrangement and an overall increase in abundance of butyrate forming populations occur during the first year of life, which is associated with an increase of intestinal butyrate formation capacity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume22
Issue9
Pages (from-to)3909-3921
Number of pages13
ISSN1462-2912
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

    Research areas

  • BACTERIA, TRANSMISSION, BIFIDOBACTERIA, COLONIZATION, REVEALS, STRAINS

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