Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients. / Mortensen, Sharri Junadi; Hurley, Meredith; Blewett, Lauren; Uber, Amy; Yassa, David; MacDonald, Mary; Patel, Parth; Chase, Maureen; Holmberg, Mathias Johan; Grossestreuer, Anne Victoria; Donnino, Michael William; Cocchi, Michael Noel.

In: Internal and Emergency Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 4, 06.2020, p. 701-709.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Mortensen, SJ, Hurley, M, Blewett, L, Uber, A, Yassa, D, MacDonald, M, Patel, P, Chase, M, Holmberg, MJ, Grossestreuer, AV, Donnino, MW & Cocchi, MN 2020, 'Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients', Internal and Emergency Medicine, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 701-709. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

APA

Mortensen, S. J., Hurley, M., Blewett, L., Uber, A., Yassa, D., MacDonald, M., Patel, P., Chase, M., Holmberg, M. J., Grossestreuer, A. V., Donnino, M. W., & Cocchi, M. N. (2020). Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients. Internal and Emergency Medicine, 15(4), 701-709. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

CBE

Mortensen SJ, Hurley M, Blewett L, Uber A, Yassa D, MacDonald M, Patel P, Chase M, Holmberg MJ, Grossestreuer AV, Donnino MW, Cocchi MN. 2020. Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients. Internal and Emergency Medicine. 15(4):701-709. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

MLA

Mortensen, Sharri Junadi et al. "Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients". Internal and Emergency Medicine. 2020, 15(4). 701-709. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

Vancouver

Mortensen SJ, Hurley M, Blewett L, Uber A, Yassa D, MacDonald M et al. Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients. Internal and Emergency Medicine. 2020 Jun;15(4):701-709. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

Author

Mortensen, Sharri Junadi ; Hurley, Meredith ; Blewett, Lauren ; Uber, Amy ; Yassa, David ; MacDonald, Mary ; Patel, Parth ; Chase, Maureen ; Holmberg, Mathias Johan ; Grossestreuer, Anne Victoria ; Donnino, Michael William ; Cocchi, Michael Noel. / Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients. In: Internal and Emergency Medicine. 2020 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 701-709.

Bibtex

@article{4176a1d7eef54c4e9a56dfc559f82f25,
title = "Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients",
abstract = "This study aims to describe infectious complications in both out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and to compare differences in antimicrobial treatment and outcomes between the two groups. This was a retrospective, single-center, observational study. Adult patients (≥ 18 years) with OHCA or IHCA who had sustained ROSC between December 2007 to March 2015 were included. Blood, urine, sputum, and other fluid cultures, as well as radiologic imaging, were obtained at the discretion of the treating clinical teams. 275 IHCA and 318 OHCA patients were included in the analysis. We found evidence of infection in 181 IHCA and 168 OHCA patients. Significant differences were found between the IHCA and OHCA group in terms of initial rhythm, duration of arrest (10 min vs. 20, p = < 0.001), targeted temperature management (30% vs. 73%, p = < 0.001), and post-arrest infection rates (66% vs 53%, p = 0.001). 95% of IHCA and 82% of OHCA patients received antimicrobial treatment in the post-cardiac arrest period. The source of infection in both groups was largely respiratory, followed by urinary. Gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods were the most common organisms identified among subjects with culture-proven bacteremia. Infections in the post-arrest period were common in both OHCA and IHCA. We found significantly more infections in IHCA compared to OHCA patients. The most common infection category was respiratory and the most common organism isolated from sputum cultures was Staphylococcus aureus coagulase-positive. The incidence of culture-positive bacteremia was similar in both OHCA and IHCA cohorts but overall lower than previously reported.",
keywords = "Antibiotics, Bacteremia, Infections, Pneumonia, Post-arrest care, Post-cardiac arrest, UTI, RISK, EARLY-ONSET PNEUMONIA, THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA, BACTEREMIA, COMPLICATIONS, SURVIVORS",
author = "Mortensen, {Sharri Junadi} and Meredith Hurley and Lauren Blewett and Amy Uber and David Yassa and Mary MacDonald and Parth Patel and Maureen Chase and Holmberg, {Mathias Johan} and Grossestreuer, {Anne Victoria} and Donnino, {Michael William} and Cocchi, {Michael Noel}",
year = "2020",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "701--709",
journal = "Internal and Emergency Medicine",
issn = "1828-0447",
publisher = "Springer - Verlag Italia Srl",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infections in out-of-hospital and in-hospital post-cardiac arrest patients

AU - Mortensen, Sharri Junadi

AU - Hurley, Meredith

AU - Blewett, Lauren

AU - Uber, Amy

AU - Yassa, David

AU - MacDonald, Mary

AU - Patel, Parth

AU - Chase, Maureen

AU - Holmberg, Mathias Johan

AU - Grossestreuer, Anne Victoria

AU - Donnino, Michael William

AU - Cocchi, Michael Noel

PY - 2020/6

Y1 - 2020/6

N2 - This study aims to describe infectious complications in both out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and to compare differences in antimicrobial treatment and outcomes between the two groups. This was a retrospective, single-center, observational study. Adult patients (≥ 18 years) with OHCA or IHCA who had sustained ROSC between December 2007 to March 2015 were included. Blood, urine, sputum, and other fluid cultures, as well as radiologic imaging, were obtained at the discretion of the treating clinical teams. 275 IHCA and 318 OHCA patients were included in the analysis. We found evidence of infection in 181 IHCA and 168 OHCA patients. Significant differences were found between the IHCA and OHCA group in terms of initial rhythm, duration of arrest (10 min vs. 20, p = < 0.001), targeted temperature management (30% vs. 73%, p = < 0.001), and post-arrest infection rates (66% vs 53%, p = 0.001). 95% of IHCA and 82% of OHCA patients received antimicrobial treatment in the post-cardiac arrest period. The source of infection in both groups was largely respiratory, followed by urinary. Gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods were the most common organisms identified among subjects with culture-proven bacteremia. Infections in the post-arrest period were common in both OHCA and IHCA. We found significantly more infections in IHCA compared to OHCA patients. The most common infection category was respiratory and the most common organism isolated from sputum cultures was Staphylococcus aureus coagulase-positive. The incidence of culture-positive bacteremia was similar in both OHCA and IHCA cohorts but overall lower than previously reported.

AB - This study aims to describe infectious complications in both out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and to compare differences in antimicrobial treatment and outcomes between the two groups. This was a retrospective, single-center, observational study. Adult patients (≥ 18 years) with OHCA or IHCA who had sustained ROSC between December 2007 to March 2015 were included. Blood, urine, sputum, and other fluid cultures, as well as radiologic imaging, were obtained at the discretion of the treating clinical teams. 275 IHCA and 318 OHCA patients were included in the analysis. We found evidence of infection in 181 IHCA and 168 OHCA patients. Significant differences were found between the IHCA and OHCA group in terms of initial rhythm, duration of arrest (10 min vs. 20, p = < 0.001), targeted temperature management (30% vs. 73%, p = < 0.001), and post-arrest infection rates (66% vs 53%, p = 0.001). 95% of IHCA and 82% of OHCA patients received antimicrobial treatment in the post-cardiac arrest period. The source of infection in both groups was largely respiratory, followed by urinary. Gram-positive cocci and gram-negative rods were the most common organisms identified among subjects with culture-proven bacteremia. Infections in the post-arrest period were common in both OHCA and IHCA. We found significantly more infections in IHCA compared to OHCA patients. The most common infection category was respiratory and the most common organism isolated from sputum cultures was Staphylococcus aureus coagulase-positive. The incidence of culture-positive bacteremia was similar in both OHCA and IHCA cohorts but overall lower than previously reported.

KW - Antibiotics

KW - Bacteremia

KW - Infections

KW - Pneumonia

KW - Post-arrest care

KW - Post-cardiac arrest

KW - UTI

KW - RISK

KW - EARLY-ONSET PNEUMONIA

KW - THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA

KW - BACTEREMIA

KW - COMPLICATIONS

KW - SURVIVORS

U2 - 10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

DO - 10.1007/s11739-020-02286-3

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32052366

VL - 15

SP - 701

EP - 709

JO - Internal and Emergency Medicine

JF - Internal and Emergency Medicine

SN - 1828-0447

IS - 4

ER -