Department of Economics and Business Economics

Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder: Study to Explore Early Development (SEED)

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder : Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). / Sabourin, Katherine R; Reynolds, Ann; Schendel, Diana; Rosenberg, Steven; Croen, Lisa A; Pinto-Martin, Jennifer A; Schieve, Laura A; Newschaffer, Craig; Lee, Li-Ching; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn.

In: Autism Research, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2019, p. 136-146.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Sabourin, KR, Reynolds, A, Schendel, D, Rosenberg, S, Croen, LA, Pinto-Martin, JA, Schieve, LA, Newschaffer, C, Lee, L-C & DiGuiseppi, C 2019, 'Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder: Study to Explore Early Development (SEED)', Autism Research, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 136-146. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.2012

APA

Sabourin, K. R., Reynolds, A., Schendel, D., Rosenberg, S., Croen, L. A., Pinto-Martin, J. A., ... DiGuiseppi, C. (2019). Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder: Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). Autism Research, 12(1), 136-146. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.2012

CBE

Sabourin KR, Reynolds A, Schendel D, Rosenberg S, Croen LA, Pinto-Martin JA, Schieve LA, Newschaffer C, Lee L-C, DiGuiseppi C. 2019. Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder: Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). Autism Research. 12(1):136-146. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.2012

MLA

Vancouver

Sabourin KR, Reynolds A, Schendel D, Rosenberg S, Croen LA, Pinto-Martin JA et al. Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder: Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). Autism Research. 2019;12(1):136-146. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.2012

Author

Sabourin, Katherine R ; Reynolds, Ann ; Schendel, Diana ; Rosenberg, Steven ; Croen, Lisa A ; Pinto-Martin, Jennifer A ; Schieve, Laura A ; Newschaffer, Craig ; Lee, Li-Ching ; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn. / Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder : Study to Explore Early Development (SEED). In: Autism Research. 2019 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 136-146.

Bibtex

@article{20ca211aefd14f7594ce93cb640a0dcd,
title = "Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder: Study to Explore Early Development (SEED)",
abstract = "Immune system abnormalities have been widely reported among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may increase the risk of childhood infections. The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED) is a multisite case-control study of children aged 30-69 months, born in 2003-2006. Cases are children previously diagnosed and newly identified with ASD enrolled from education and clinical settings. Children with a previously diagnosed non-ASD developmental condition were included in the developmental delay/disorder (DD) control group. The population (POP) control group included children randomly sampled from birth certificates. Clinical illness from infection during the first 28 days ({"}neonatal,{"} from medical records) and first three years of life (caregiver report) in cases was compared to DD and POP controls; and between cases with and without regression. Children with ASD had greater odds of neonatal (OR = 1.8; 95{\%}CI: 1.1, 2.9) and early childhood infection (OR = 1.7; 95{\%}CI: 1.5, 1.9) compared to POP children, and greater odds of neonatal infection (OR = 1.5; 95{\%}CI: 1.1, 2.0) compared to DD children. Cases with regression had 1.6 times the odds (95{\%}CI: 1.1, 2.3) of caregiver-reported infection during the first year of life compared to cases without regression, but neonatal infection risk and overall early childhood infection risk did not differ. Our results support the hypothesis that children with ASD are more likely to have infection early in life compared to the general population and to children with other developmental conditions. Future studies should examine the contributions of different causes, timing, frequency, and severity of infection to ASD risk. Autism Res 2018. {\circledC} 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. LAY SUMMARY: We looked at infections during early childhood in relation to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We found that children with ASD were more likely to have an infection in the first 28 days of life and before age three compared to children with typical development. Children with ASD were also more likely than children with other developmental delays or disorders to have an infection in the first 28 days of life.",
author = "Sabourin, {Katherine R} and Ann Reynolds and Diana Schendel and Steven Rosenberg and Croen, {Lisa A} and Pinto-Martin, {Jennifer A} and Schieve, {Laura A} and Craig Newschaffer and Li-Ching Lee and Carolyn DiGuiseppi",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1002/aur.2012",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "136--146",
journal = "Autism Research",
issn = "1939-3792",
publisher = "John/Wiley & Sons, Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infections in children with autism spectrum disorder

T2 - Study to Explore Early Development (SEED)

AU - Sabourin, Katherine R

AU - Reynolds, Ann

AU - Schendel, Diana

AU - Rosenberg, Steven

AU - Croen, Lisa A

AU - Pinto-Martin, Jennifer A

AU - Schieve, Laura A

AU - Newschaffer, Craig

AU - Lee, Li-Ching

AU - DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

N1 - © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Immune system abnormalities have been widely reported among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may increase the risk of childhood infections. The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED) is a multisite case-control study of children aged 30-69 months, born in 2003-2006. Cases are children previously diagnosed and newly identified with ASD enrolled from education and clinical settings. Children with a previously diagnosed non-ASD developmental condition were included in the developmental delay/disorder (DD) control group. The population (POP) control group included children randomly sampled from birth certificates. Clinical illness from infection during the first 28 days ("neonatal," from medical records) and first three years of life (caregiver report) in cases was compared to DD and POP controls; and between cases with and without regression. Children with ASD had greater odds of neonatal (OR = 1.8; 95%CI: 1.1, 2.9) and early childhood infection (OR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.5, 1.9) compared to POP children, and greater odds of neonatal infection (OR = 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1, 2.0) compared to DD children. Cases with regression had 1.6 times the odds (95%CI: 1.1, 2.3) of caregiver-reported infection during the first year of life compared to cases without regression, but neonatal infection risk and overall early childhood infection risk did not differ. Our results support the hypothesis that children with ASD are more likely to have infection early in life compared to the general population and to children with other developmental conditions. Future studies should examine the contributions of different causes, timing, frequency, and severity of infection to ASD risk. Autism Res 2018. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. LAY SUMMARY: We looked at infections during early childhood in relation to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We found that children with ASD were more likely to have an infection in the first 28 days of life and before age three compared to children with typical development. Children with ASD were also more likely than children with other developmental delays or disorders to have an infection in the first 28 days of life.

AB - Immune system abnormalities have been widely reported among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may increase the risk of childhood infections. The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED) is a multisite case-control study of children aged 30-69 months, born in 2003-2006. Cases are children previously diagnosed and newly identified with ASD enrolled from education and clinical settings. Children with a previously diagnosed non-ASD developmental condition were included in the developmental delay/disorder (DD) control group. The population (POP) control group included children randomly sampled from birth certificates. Clinical illness from infection during the first 28 days ("neonatal," from medical records) and first three years of life (caregiver report) in cases was compared to DD and POP controls; and between cases with and without regression. Children with ASD had greater odds of neonatal (OR = 1.8; 95%CI: 1.1, 2.9) and early childhood infection (OR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.5, 1.9) compared to POP children, and greater odds of neonatal infection (OR = 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1, 2.0) compared to DD children. Cases with regression had 1.6 times the odds (95%CI: 1.1, 2.3) of caregiver-reported infection during the first year of life compared to cases without regression, but neonatal infection risk and overall early childhood infection risk did not differ. Our results support the hypothesis that children with ASD are more likely to have infection early in life compared to the general population and to children with other developmental conditions. Future studies should examine the contributions of different causes, timing, frequency, and severity of infection to ASD risk. Autism Res 2018. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. LAY SUMMARY: We looked at infections during early childhood in relation to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We found that children with ASD were more likely to have an infection in the first 28 days of life and before age three compared to children with typical development. Children with ASD were also more likely than children with other developmental delays or disorders to have an infection in the first 28 days of life.

U2 - 10.1002/aur.2012

DO - 10.1002/aur.2012

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

SP - 136

EP - 146

JO - Autism Research

JF - Autism Research

SN - 1939-3792

IS - 1

ER -