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Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking: implications for music and language processing

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Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking : implications for music and language processing. / Liu, Fang; Jiang, Cunmei; Pfordresher, Peter Q; Mantell, James T; Xu, Yi; Yang, Yufang; Stewart, Lauren.

In: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 75, No. 8, 11.2013, p. 1783-98.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Liu, F, Jiang, C, Pfordresher, PQ, Mantell, JT, Xu, Y, Yang, Y & Stewart, L 2013, 'Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking: implications for music and language processing', Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, vol. 75, no. 8, pp. 1783-98. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1

APA

Liu, F., Jiang, C., Pfordresher, P. Q., Mantell, J. T., Xu, Y., Yang, Y., & Stewart, L. (2013). Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking: implications for music and language processing. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 75(8), 1783-98. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1

CBE

Liu F, Jiang C, Pfordresher PQ, Mantell JT, Xu Y, Yang Y, Stewart L. 2013. Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking: implications for music and language processing. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. 75(8):1783-98. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1

MLA

Vancouver

Liu F, Jiang C, Pfordresher PQ, Mantell JT, Xu Y, Yang Y et al. Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking: implications for music and language processing. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. 2013 Nov;75(8):1783-98. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1

Author

Liu, Fang ; Jiang, Cunmei ; Pfordresher, Peter Q ; Mantell, James T ; Xu, Yi ; Yang, Yufang ; Stewart, Lauren. / Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking : implications for music and language processing. In: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics. 2013 ; Vol. 75, No. 8. pp. 1783-98.

Bibtex

@article{5adb5f1884be4e58baafde360bd00141,
title = "Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking: implications for music and language processing",
abstract = "In this study, we investigated the impact of congenital amusia, a disorder of musical processing, on speech and song imitation in speakers of a tone language, Mandarin. A group of 13 Mandarin-speaking individuals with congenital amusia and 13 matched controls were recorded while imitating a set of speech and two sets of song stimuli with varying pitch and rhythm patterns. The results indicated that individuals with congenital amusia were worse than controls in both speech and song imitation, in terms of both pitch matching (absolute and relative) and rhythm matching (relative time and number of time errors). Like the controls, individuals with congenital amusia achieved better absolute and relative pitch matching and made fewer pitch interval and contour errors in song than in speech imitation. These findings point toward domain-general pitch (and time) production deficits in congenital amusia, suggesting the presence of shared pitch production mechanisms but distinct requirements for pitch-matching accuracy in language and music processing.",
keywords = "Adult, Auditory Perceptual Disorders, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Imitative Behavior, Language Development Disorders, Male, Music, Pitch Discrimination, Pitch Perception, Singing, Speech Perception, Young Adult",
author = "Fang Liu and Cunmei Jiang and Pfordresher, {Peter Q} and Mantell, {James T} and Yi Xu and Yufang Yang and Lauren Stewart",
year = "2013",
month = nov,
doi = "10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "1783--98",
journal = "Attention, Perception & Psychophysics",
issn = "1943-3921",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Individuals with congenital amusia imitate pitches more accurately in singing than in speaking

T2 - implications for music and language processing

AU - Liu, Fang

AU - Jiang, Cunmei

AU - Pfordresher, Peter Q

AU - Mantell, James T

AU - Xu, Yi

AU - Yang, Yufang

AU - Stewart, Lauren

PY - 2013/11

Y1 - 2013/11

N2 - In this study, we investigated the impact of congenital amusia, a disorder of musical processing, on speech and song imitation in speakers of a tone language, Mandarin. A group of 13 Mandarin-speaking individuals with congenital amusia and 13 matched controls were recorded while imitating a set of speech and two sets of song stimuli with varying pitch and rhythm patterns. The results indicated that individuals with congenital amusia were worse than controls in both speech and song imitation, in terms of both pitch matching (absolute and relative) and rhythm matching (relative time and number of time errors). Like the controls, individuals with congenital amusia achieved better absolute and relative pitch matching and made fewer pitch interval and contour errors in song than in speech imitation. These findings point toward domain-general pitch (and time) production deficits in congenital amusia, suggesting the presence of shared pitch production mechanisms but distinct requirements for pitch-matching accuracy in language and music processing.

AB - In this study, we investigated the impact of congenital amusia, a disorder of musical processing, on speech and song imitation in speakers of a tone language, Mandarin. A group of 13 Mandarin-speaking individuals with congenital amusia and 13 matched controls were recorded while imitating a set of speech and two sets of song stimuli with varying pitch and rhythm patterns. The results indicated that individuals with congenital amusia were worse than controls in both speech and song imitation, in terms of both pitch matching (absolute and relative) and rhythm matching (relative time and number of time errors). Like the controls, individuals with congenital amusia achieved better absolute and relative pitch matching and made fewer pitch interval and contour errors in song than in speech imitation. These findings point toward domain-general pitch (and time) production deficits in congenital amusia, suggesting the presence of shared pitch production mechanisms but distinct requirements for pitch-matching accuracy in language and music processing.

KW - Adult

KW - Auditory Perceptual Disorders

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Imitative Behavior

KW - Language Development Disorders

KW - Male

KW - Music

KW - Pitch Discrimination

KW - Pitch Perception

KW - Singing

KW - Speech Perception

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1

DO - 10.3758/s13414-013-0506-1

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 23877539

VL - 75

SP - 1783

EP - 1798

JO - Attention, Perception & Psychophysics

JF - Attention, Perception & Psychophysics

SN - 1943-3921

IS - 8

ER -