Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep: Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling

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Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep : Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling. / Jobst, Beatrice M; Hindriks, Rikkert; Laufs, Helmut; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Hahn, Gerald; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Stevner, Angus B A; Kringelbach, Morten L; Deco, Gustavo.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 05.07.2017, p. 4634.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Jobst, B. M., Hindriks, R., Laufs, H., Tagliazucchi, E., Hahn, G., Ponce-Alvarez, A., ... Deco, G. (2017). Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep: Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling. Scientific Reports, 7(1), 4634. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-04522-x

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Author

Jobst, Beatrice M ; Hindriks, Rikkert ; Laufs, Helmut ; Tagliazucchi, Enzo ; Hahn, Gerald ; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián ; Stevner, Angus B A ; Kringelbach, Morten L ; Deco, Gustavo. / Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep : Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 4634.

Bibtex

@article{87ba8840625e4debabdeab4bad472cee,
title = "Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep: Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling",
abstract = "Recent research has found that the human sleep cycle is characterised by changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity. Yet, we are still missing a mechanistic explanation of the local neuronal dynamics underlying these changes. We used whole-brain computational modelling to study the differences in global brain functional connectivity and synchrony of fMRI activity in healthy humans during wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. We applied a whole-brain model based on the normal form of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation and studied the dynamical changes when adapting the bifurcation parameter for all brain nodes to best match wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. Furthermore, we analysed differences in effective connectivity between the two states. In addition to significant changes in functional connectivity, synchrony and metastability, this analysis revealed a significant shift of the global dynamic working point of brain dynamics, from the edge of the transition between damped to sustained oscillations during wakefulness, to a stable focus during slow-wave sleep. Moreover, we identified a significant global decrease in effective interactions during slow-wave sleep. These results suggest a mechanism for the empirical functional changes observed during slow-wave sleep, namely a global shift of the brain's dynamic working point leading to increased stability and decreased effective connectivity.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Jobst, {Beatrice M} and Rikkert Hindriks and Helmut Laufs and Enzo Tagliazucchi and Gerald Hahn and Adri{\'a}n Ponce-Alvarez and Stevner, {Angus B A} and Kringelbach, {Morten L} and Gustavo Deco",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-017-04522-x",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "4634",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep

T2 - Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling

AU - Jobst, Beatrice M

AU - Hindriks, Rikkert

AU - Laufs, Helmut

AU - Tagliazucchi, Enzo

AU - Hahn, Gerald

AU - Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián

AU - Stevner, Angus B A

AU - Kringelbach, Morten L

AU - Deco, Gustavo

PY - 2017/7/5

Y1 - 2017/7/5

N2 - Recent research has found that the human sleep cycle is characterised by changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity. Yet, we are still missing a mechanistic explanation of the local neuronal dynamics underlying these changes. We used whole-brain computational modelling to study the differences in global brain functional connectivity and synchrony of fMRI activity in healthy humans during wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. We applied a whole-brain model based on the normal form of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation and studied the dynamical changes when adapting the bifurcation parameter for all brain nodes to best match wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. Furthermore, we analysed differences in effective connectivity between the two states. In addition to significant changes in functional connectivity, synchrony and metastability, this analysis revealed a significant shift of the global dynamic working point of brain dynamics, from the edge of the transition between damped to sustained oscillations during wakefulness, to a stable focus during slow-wave sleep. Moreover, we identified a significant global decrease in effective interactions during slow-wave sleep. These results suggest a mechanism for the empirical functional changes observed during slow-wave sleep, namely a global shift of the brain's dynamic working point leading to increased stability and decreased effective connectivity.

AB - Recent research has found that the human sleep cycle is characterised by changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity. Yet, we are still missing a mechanistic explanation of the local neuronal dynamics underlying these changes. We used whole-brain computational modelling to study the differences in global brain functional connectivity and synchrony of fMRI activity in healthy humans during wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. We applied a whole-brain model based on the normal form of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation and studied the dynamical changes when adapting the bifurcation parameter for all brain nodes to best match wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. Furthermore, we analysed differences in effective connectivity between the two states. In addition to significant changes in functional connectivity, synchrony and metastability, this analysis revealed a significant shift of the global dynamic working point of brain dynamics, from the edge of the transition between damped to sustained oscillations during wakefulness, to a stable focus during slow-wave sleep. Moreover, we identified a significant global decrease in effective interactions during slow-wave sleep. These results suggest a mechanism for the empirical functional changes observed during slow-wave sleep, namely a global shift of the brain's dynamic working point leading to increased stability and decreased effective connectivity.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-017-04522-x

DO - 10.1038/s41598-017-04522-x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28680119

VL - 7

SP - 4634

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

ER -