Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences

Improving monitoring of implementation of alcohol policy: a case study from Estonia

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleCommunication

  • Joana Madureira Lima, World Health Organization European Office for Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, Moscow, Russian Federation, Russian Federation
  • Julie Elizabeth Brummer
  • Lisa Schölin, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Triinu Täth, Ministry of Social Affairs, Tallinn, Estonia, Estonia
  • Lauri Beekmann, Nordic Alcohol and Drug Policy Network, Türi, Estonia, Estonia
  • Carina Ferreira-Borges, World Health Organization European Office for Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, Moscow, Russian Federation, Russian Federation
Background: Alcohol consumption is an increasingly important contributor to the global burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Goal 3 of the Sustainable Development Goals provides concrete targets for tackling the NCD burden, and Goal 10 highlights the importance of sound policies for reducing inequalites. Alcohol control policy, for one, has a critical role to play in mitigating the harmful effects of alcohol consumption, reducing inequalities in the distribution of alcohol-related harm and thus reducing the incidence and prevalence of NCDs.
Regional and Local Contexts: While the WHO European Region is on track to meet the agreed global premature mortality goal, alcohol consumption is not decreasing at a sufficient pace to achieve the overall agreed targets in the global monitoring framework for the prevention and control of NCDs. Here, we use the evolution of alcohol control policy in Estonia in the past decade as a case study
of successful policy formulation and implementation. We also highlight the European action plan to reduce the harmful use of alcohol 2012–2020 (EAPA) composite indicators for monitoring policy implementation.
Ways forward: The Estonian case study shows that successful policy responses in the reduction of alcohol consumption are likely to be multipronged, covering a wide range of policy areas, to have gathered support across society, from policy-makers to researchers and including parents and advocates, and to anticipate and address pressures from vested interests. The EAPA composite indicators can help countries to map the policy tools at their disposal and to track their progress both across time and relative to other countries. Future iterations of these indicators will build on the current baseline and establish a comprehensive picture of alcohol control progress in the WHO European Region.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPublic Health Panorama
Volume4
Issue3
Pages (from-to)378-383
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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