'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence

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'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence. / Kjærgaard, Peter C.

In: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 65, No. 1, 2011, p. 83-98.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Kjærgaard, PC 2011, ''Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence', Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 83-98. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsnr.2010.0101

APA

Kjærgaard, P. C. (2011). 'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence. Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 65(1), 83-98. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsnr.2010.0101

CBE

MLA

Kjærgaard, Peter C. "'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence". Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London. 2011, 65(1). 83-98. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsnr.2010.0101

Vancouver

Author

Kjærgaard, Peter C. / 'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence. In: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London. 2011 ; Vol. 65, No. 1. pp. 83-98.

Bibtex

@article{bbeb3800039511e083f5000ea68e967b,
title = "'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence",
abstract = "In the nineteenth century the idea of a {\textquoteleft}missing link{\textquoteright} connecting humans with the rest of the animal kingdom was eagerly embraced by professional scientists and popularizers. After the publication of Charles Darwin{\textquoteright}s Origin of Species in 1859, many tied the idea and subsequent search for a crucial piece of evidence to Darwin and his formulation of the theory of evolution by natural selection. This article demonstrates that the expression was widely used and that the framework for discussions about human{\textquoteright}s relation to the apes and gaps in the fossil record were well in place and widely debated long before Origin of Species became the standard reference for discussing human evolution. In the second half of the century the missing link gradually became the ultimate prize in palaeoanthropology and grew into one of the most powerful, celebrated and criticized icons of human evolution.",
keywords = "anthropology, Charles Darwin, evolution, human origins, missing link, nineteenth century",
author = "Kj{\ae}rgaard, {Peter C.}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1098/rsnr.2010.0101",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "83--98",
journal = "Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London",
issn = "0035-9149",
publisher = "The Royal Society Publishing",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence

AU - Kjærgaard, Peter C.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - In the nineteenth century the idea of a ‘missing link’ connecting humans with the rest of the animal kingdom was eagerly embraced by professional scientists and popularizers. After the publication of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species in 1859, many tied the idea and subsequent search for a crucial piece of evidence to Darwin and his formulation of the theory of evolution by natural selection. This article demonstrates that the expression was widely used and that the framework for discussions about human’s relation to the apes and gaps in the fossil record were well in place and widely debated long before Origin of Species became the standard reference for discussing human evolution. In the second half of the century the missing link gradually became the ultimate prize in palaeoanthropology and grew into one of the most powerful, celebrated and criticized icons of human evolution.

AB - In the nineteenth century the idea of a ‘missing link’ connecting humans with the rest of the animal kingdom was eagerly embraced by professional scientists and popularizers. After the publication of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species in 1859, many tied the idea and subsequent search for a crucial piece of evidence to Darwin and his formulation of the theory of evolution by natural selection. This article demonstrates that the expression was widely used and that the framework for discussions about human’s relation to the apes and gaps in the fossil record were well in place and widely debated long before Origin of Species became the standard reference for discussing human evolution. In the second half of the century the missing link gradually became the ultimate prize in palaeoanthropology and grew into one of the most powerful, celebrated and criticized icons of human evolution.

KW - anthropology, Charles Darwin, evolution, human origins, missing link, nineteenth century

U2 - 10.1098/rsnr.2010.0101

DO - 10.1098/rsnr.2010.0101

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21553608

VL - 65

SP - 83

EP - 98

JO - Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London

JF - Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London

SN - 0035-9149

IS - 1

ER -