Department of Political Science

How Politicians See Their Relationship with Top Bureaucrats: Revisiting Classical Images

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How Politicians See Their Relationship with Top Bureaucrats : Revisiting Classical Images. / Bækgaard, Martin; Blom-Hansen, Jens; Serritzlew, Søren.

In: Governance: An international journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.2022, p. 5-24.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Bækgaard, M, Blom-Hansen, J & Serritzlew, S 2022, 'How Politicians See Their Relationship with Top Bureaucrats: Revisiting Classical Images', Governance: An international journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 5-24. https://doi.org/10.1111/gove.12558

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Author

Bækgaard, Martin ; Blom-Hansen, Jens ; Serritzlew, Søren. / How Politicians See Their Relationship with Top Bureaucrats : Revisiting Classical Images. In: Governance: An international journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions. 2022 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 5-24.

Bibtex

@article{7a5dc63b87f04c03b02b1800a765654e,
title = "How Politicians See Their Relationship with Top Bureaucrats: Revisiting Classical Images",
abstract = "The relationship between politicians and bureaucrats is an enduring concern in political science. Central to this debate, Aberbach, Putnam, and Rockman (APR) in 1981 developed four images to characterize political‐bureaucratic relations. We argue that the one‐dimensional focus on roles in their images comes with important limitations. To deal with these limitations, we collect survey responses from 3,384 local politicians from four countries on seven dimensions of the political‐bureaucratic relationship. We then use cluster analysis to develop six images bottom‐up. Five of our images are largely consistent with APR's image II and III. Yet, they differ in the extent to which politicians trust the bureaucracy, consider them loyal, and see them as an important source of information. A sixth image is not consistent with any of APR's images. We find that both systemic (country, municipality size) and individual factors (ideology, position, seniority) contribute to differences in images. Overall, our images suggest that political‐bureaucratic relations vary more between and within political systems than suggested by APR's images.",
keywords = "ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONS, CIVIL-SERVANTS, ERA, MANAGERS, MINISTERS",
author = "Martin B{\ae}kgaard and Jens Blom-Hansen and S{\o}ren Serritzlew",
year = "2022",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1111/gove.12558",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "5--24",
journal = "Governance: An international journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions",
issn = "0952-1895",
publisher = "Wiley Online",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How Politicians See Their Relationship with Top Bureaucrats

T2 - Revisiting Classical Images

AU - Bækgaard, Martin

AU - Blom-Hansen, Jens

AU - Serritzlew, Søren

PY - 2022/1

Y1 - 2022/1

N2 - The relationship between politicians and bureaucrats is an enduring concern in political science. Central to this debate, Aberbach, Putnam, and Rockman (APR) in 1981 developed four images to characterize political‐bureaucratic relations. We argue that the one‐dimensional focus on roles in their images comes with important limitations. To deal with these limitations, we collect survey responses from 3,384 local politicians from four countries on seven dimensions of the political‐bureaucratic relationship. We then use cluster analysis to develop six images bottom‐up. Five of our images are largely consistent with APR's image II and III. Yet, they differ in the extent to which politicians trust the bureaucracy, consider them loyal, and see them as an important source of information. A sixth image is not consistent with any of APR's images. We find that both systemic (country, municipality size) and individual factors (ideology, position, seniority) contribute to differences in images. Overall, our images suggest that political‐bureaucratic relations vary more between and within political systems than suggested by APR's images.

AB - The relationship between politicians and bureaucrats is an enduring concern in political science. Central to this debate, Aberbach, Putnam, and Rockman (APR) in 1981 developed four images to characterize political‐bureaucratic relations. We argue that the one‐dimensional focus on roles in their images comes with important limitations. To deal with these limitations, we collect survey responses from 3,384 local politicians from four countries on seven dimensions of the political‐bureaucratic relationship. We then use cluster analysis to develop six images bottom‐up. Five of our images are largely consistent with APR's image II and III. Yet, they differ in the extent to which politicians trust the bureaucracy, consider them loyal, and see them as an important source of information. A sixth image is not consistent with any of APR's images. We find that both systemic (country, municipality size) and individual factors (ideology, position, seniority) contribute to differences in images. Overall, our images suggest that political‐bureaucratic relations vary more between and within political systems than suggested by APR's images.

KW - ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONS

KW - CIVIL-SERVANTS

KW - ERA

KW - MANAGERS

KW - MINISTERS

U2 - 10.1111/gove.12558

DO - 10.1111/gove.12558

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 5

EP - 24

JO - Governance: An international journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions

JF - Governance: An international journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions

SN - 0952-1895

IS - 1

ER -