Department of Management

How does consumer knowledge affect environmentally sustainable choices? Evidence from a cross-country latent class analysis of food labels

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

How does consumer knowledge affect environmentally sustainable choices? Evidence from a cross-country latent class analysis of food labels. / Peschel, Anne O.; Grebitus, Carola; Steiner, Bodo; Veeman, Michele.

In: Appetite, Vol. 106, 01.11.2016, p. 78-91.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{018c02b12ceb4df3ac7405b563062b33,
title = "How does consumer knowledge affect environmentally sustainable choices?: Evidence from a cross-country latent class analysis of food labels",
abstract = "This paper examines consumers' knowledge and lifestyle profiles and preferences regarding two environmentallylabeled food staples, potatoes and ground beef. Data from online choice experiments conducted in Canada and Germany are analyzed through latent class choice modeling to identify theinfluence of consumer knowledge (subjective and objective knowledge as well as usage experience) on environmentally sustainable choices. We find that irrespective of product or country under investigation, high subjective and objective knowledge levels drive environmentally sustainable food choices. Subjective knowledge was found to be more important in this context. Usage experience had relatively little impact on environmentally sustainable choices. Our results suggest that about 20% of consumers in both countries are ready to adopt footprint labels in their food choices. Another 10e20% could be targeted by enhancing subjective knowledge, for example through targeted marketing campaigns",
author = "Peschel, {Anne O.} and Carola Grebitus and Bodo Steiner and Michele Veeman",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.162",
language = "English",
volume = "106",
pages = "78--91",
journal = "Appetite",
issn = "0195-6663",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
note = "143th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar : Consumer Behavior in a Changing World: Food, Culture, Society ; Conference date: 25-03-2015 Through 27-03-2015",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How does consumer knowledge affect environmentally sustainable choices?

T2 - 143th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar

AU - Peschel, Anne O.

AU - Grebitus, Carola

AU - Steiner, Bodo

AU - Veeman, Michele

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - This paper examines consumers' knowledge and lifestyle profiles and preferences regarding two environmentallylabeled food staples, potatoes and ground beef. Data from online choice experiments conducted in Canada and Germany are analyzed through latent class choice modeling to identify theinfluence of consumer knowledge (subjective and objective knowledge as well as usage experience) on environmentally sustainable choices. We find that irrespective of product or country under investigation, high subjective and objective knowledge levels drive environmentally sustainable food choices. Subjective knowledge was found to be more important in this context. Usage experience had relatively little impact on environmentally sustainable choices. Our results suggest that about 20% of consumers in both countries are ready to adopt footprint labels in their food choices. Another 10e20% could be targeted by enhancing subjective knowledge, for example through targeted marketing campaigns

AB - This paper examines consumers' knowledge and lifestyle profiles and preferences regarding two environmentallylabeled food staples, potatoes and ground beef. Data from online choice experiments conducted in Canada and Germany are analyzed through latent class choice modeling to identify theinfluence of consumer knowledge (subjective and objective knowledge as well as usage experience) on environmentally sustainable choices. We find that irrespective of product or country under investigation, high subjective and objective knowledge levels drive environmentally sustainable food choices. Subjective knowledge was found to be more important in this context. Usage experience had relatively little impact on environmentally sustainable choices. Our results suggest that about 20% of consumers in both countries are ready to adopt footprint labels in their food choices. Another 10e20% could be targeted by enhancing subjective knowledge, for example through targeted marketing campaigns

U2 - 10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.162

DO - 10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.162

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26944229

VL - 106

SP - 78

EP - 91

JO - Appetite

JF - Appetite

SN - 0195-6663

Y2 - 25 March 2015 through 27 March 2015

ER -