Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms

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Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms. / MacKenzie, L E; Patterson, V C; Zwicker, A; Drobinin, V; Fisher, H L; Abidi, S; Greve, A N; Bagnell, A; Propper, L; Alda, M; Pavlova, Z B; Uher, R.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 16, 2017, p. 2844-5853.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

MacKenzie, LE, Patterson, VC, Zwicker, A, Drobinin, V, Fisher, HL, Abidi, S, Greve, AN, Bagnell, A, Propper, L, Alda, M, Pavlova, ZB & Uher, R 2017, 'Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms', Psychological Medicine, vol. 47, no. 16, pp. 2844-5853. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717001374

APA

MacKenzie, L. E., Patterson, V. C., Zwicker, A., Drobinin, V., Fisher, H. L., Abidi, S., ... Uher, R. (2017). Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms. Psychological Medicine, 47(16), 2844-5853. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717001374

CBE

MacKenzie LE, Patterson VC, Zwicker A, Drobinin V, Fisher HL, Abidi S, Greve AN, Bagnell A, Propper L, Alda M, Pavlova ZB, Uher R. 2017. Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms. Psychological Medicine. 47(16):2844-5853. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717001374

MLA

MacKenzie, L E et al. "Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms". Psychological Medicine. 2017, 47(16). 2844-5853. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717001374

Vancouver

MacKenzie LE, Patterson VC, Zwicker A, Drobinin V, Fisher HL, Abidi S et al. Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms. Psychological Medicine. 2017;47(16):2844-5853. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717001374

Author

MacKenzie, L E ; Patterson, V C ; Zwicker, A ; Drobinin, V ; Fisher, H L ; Abidi, S ; Greve, A N ; Bagnell, A ; Propper, L ; Alda, M ; Pavlova, Z B ; Uher, R. / Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms. In: Psychological Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 47, No. 16. pp. 2844-5853.

Bibtex

@article{f938edbca69b470db8876b2180573193,
title = "Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Psychotic symptoms are common in children and adolescents and may be early manifestations of liability to severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia. SMI and psychotic symptoms are associated with impairment in executive functions. However, previous studies have not differentiated between 'cold' and 'hot' executive functions. We hypothesized that the propensity for psychotic symptoms is specifically associated with impairment in 'hot' executive functions, such as decision-making in the context of uncertain rewards and losses.METHODS: In a cohort of 156 youth (mean age 12.5, range 7-24 years) enriched for familial risk of SMI, we measured cold and hot executive functions with the spatial working memory (SWM) task (total errors) and the Cambridge Gambling Task (decision-making), respectively. We assessed psychotic symptoms using the semi-structured Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia interview, Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes, Funny Feelings, and Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument - Child and Youth version.RESULTS: In total 69 (44.23{\%}) youth reported psychotic symptoms on one or more assessments. Cold executive functioning, indexed with SWM errors, was not significantly related to psychotic symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 1.36, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.85-2.17, p = 0.204). Poor hot executive functioning, indexed as decision-making score, was associated with psychotic symptoms after adjustment for age, sex and familial clustering (OR 2.37, 95{\%} CI 1.25-4.50, p = 0.008). The association between worse hot executive functions and psychotic symptoms remained significant in sensitivity analyses controlling for general cognitive ability and cold executive functions.CONCLUSIONS: Impaired hot executive functions may be an indicator of risk and a target for pre-emptive early interventions in youth.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "MacKenzie, {L E} and Patterson, {V C} and A Zwicker and V Drobinin and Fisher, {H L} and S Abidi and Greve, {A N} and A Bagnell and L Propper and M Alda and Pavlova, {Z B} and R Uher",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291717001374",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "2844--5853",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "16",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hot and cold executive functions in youth with psychotic symptoms

AU - MacKenzie, L E

AU - Patterson, V C

AU - Zwicker, A

AU - Drobinin, V

AU - Fisher, H L

AU - Abidi, S

AU - Greve, A N

AU - Bagnell, A

AU - Propper, L

AU - Alda, M

AU - Pavlova, Z B

AU - Uher, R

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BACKGROUND: Psychotic symptoms are common in children and adolescents and may be early manifestations of liability to severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia. SMI and psychotic symptoms are associated with impairment in executive functions. However, previous studies have not differentiated between 'cold' and 'hot' executive functions. We hypothesized that the propensity for psychotic symptoms is specifically associated with impairment in 'hot' executive functions, such as decision-making in the context of uncertain rewards and losses.METHODS: In a cohort of 156 youth (mean age 12.5, range 7-24 years) enriched for familial risk of SMI, we measured cold and hot executive functions with the spatial working memory (SWM) task (total errors) and the Cambridge Gambling Task (decision-making), respectively. We assessed psychotic symptoms using the semi-structured Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia interview, Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes, Funny Feelings, and Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument - Child and Youth version.RESULTS: In total 69 (44.23%) youth reported psychotic symptoms on one or more assessments. Cold executive functioning, indexed with SWM errors, was not significantly related to psychotic symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-2.17, p = 0.204). Poor hot executive functioning, indexed as decision-making score, was associated with psychotic symptoms after adjustment for age, sex and familial clustering (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.25-4.50, p = 0.008). The association between worse hot executive functions and psychotic symptoms remained significant in sensitivity analyses controlling for general cognitive ability and cold executive functions.CONCLUSIONS: Impaired hot executive functions may be an indicator of risk and a target for pre-emptive early interventions in youth.

AB - BACKGROUND: Psychotic symptoms are common in children and adolescents and may be early manifestations of liability to severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia. SMI and psychotic symptoms are associated with impairment in executive functions. However, previous studies have not differentiated between 'cold' and 'hot' executive functions. We hypothesized that the propensity for psychotic symptoms is specifically associated with impairment in 'hot' executive functions, such as decision-making in the context of uncertain rewards and losses.METHODS: In a cohort of 156 youth (mean age 12.5, range 7-24 years) enriched for familial risk of SMI, we measured cold and hot executive functions with the spatial working memory (SWM) task (total errors) and the Cambridge Gambling Task (decision-making), respectively. We assessed psychotic symptoms using the semi-structured Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia interview, Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes, Funny Feelings, and Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument - Child and Youth version.RESULTS: In total 69 (44.23%) youth reported psychotic symptoms on one or more assessments. Cold executive functioning, indexed with SWM errors, was not significantly related to psychotic symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-2.17, p = 0.204). Poor hot executive functioning, indexed as decision-making score, was associated with psychotic symptoms after adjustment for age, sex and familial clustering (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.25-4.50, p = 0.008). The association between worse hot executive functions and psychotic symptoms remained significant in sensitivity analyses controlling for general cognitive ability and cold executive functions.CONCLUSIONS: Impaired hot executive functions may be an indicator of risk and a target for pre-emptive early interventions in youth.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291717001374

DO - 10.1017/S0033291717001374

M3 - Journal article

VL - 47

SP - 2844

EP - 5853

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 16

ER -