Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers. / Weinstein, Daniel; Launay, Jacques; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin I M; Stewart, Lauren.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.03.2016, p. 152-158.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Weinstein, D, Launay, J, Pearce, E, Dunbar, RIM & Stewart, L 2016, 'Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers', Evolution and Human Behavior, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 152-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002

APA

Weinstein, D., Launay, J., Pearce, E., Dunbar, R. I. M., & Stewart, L. (2016). Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers. Evolution and Human Behavior, 37(2), 152-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002

CBE

Weinstein D, Launay J, Pearce E, Dunbar RIM, Stewart L. 2016. Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers. Evolution and Human Behavior. 37(2):152-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002

MLA

Vancouver

Weinstein D, Launay J, Pearce E, Dunbar RIM, Stewart L. Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers. Evolution and Human Behavior. 2016 Mar 1;37(2):152-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002

Author

Weinstein, Daniel ; Launay, Jacques ; Pearce, Eiluned ; Dunbar, Robin I M ; Stewart, Lauren. / Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers. In: Evolution and Human Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 152-158.

Bibtex

@article{5f65bb9c4daf488aa210ecf373133582,
title = "Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers",
abstract = "Over our evolutionary history, humans have faced the problem of how to create and maintain social bonds in progressively larger groups compared to those of our primate ancestors. Evidence from historical and anthropological records suggests that group music-making might act as a mechanism by which this large-scale social bonding could occur. While previous research has shown effects of music making on social bonds in small group contexts, the question of whether this effect 'scales up' to larger groups is particularly important when considering the potential role of music for large-scale social bonding. The current study recruited individuals from a community choir that met in both small (n = 20 - 80) and large (a 'megachoir' combining individuals from the smaller subchoirs n = 232) group contexts. Participants gave self-report measures (via a survey) of social bonding and had pain threshold measurements taken (as a proxy for endorphin release) before and after 90 minutes of singing. Results showed that feelings of inclusion, connectivity, positive affect, and measures of endorphin release all increased across singing rehearsals and that the influence of group singing was comparable for pain thresholds in the large versus small group context. Levels of social closeness were found to be greater at pre- and post-levels for the small choir condition. However, the large choir condition experienced a greater change in social closeness as compared to the small condition. The finding that singing together fosters social closeness - even in large contexts where individuals are not known to each other - is consistent with evolutionary accounts that emphasize the role of music in social bonding, particularly in the context of creating larger cohesive groups than other primates are able to manage.",
author = "Daniel Weinstein and Jacques Launay and Eiluned Pearce and Dunbar, {Robin I M} and Lauren Stewart",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "152--158",
journal = "Evolution and Human Behavior",
issn = "1090-5138",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Group music performance causes elevated pain thresholds and social bonding in small and large groups of singers

AU - Weinstein, Daniel

AU - Launay, Jacques

AU - Pearce, Eiluned

AU - Dunbar, Robin I M

AU - Stewart, Lauren

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Over our evolutionary history, humans have faced the problem of how to create and maintain social bonds in progressively larger groups compared to those of our primate ancestors. Evidence from historical and anthropological records suggests that group music-making might act as a mechanism by which this large-scale social bonding could occur. While previous research has shown effects of music making on social bonds in small group contexts, the question of whether this effect 'scales up' to larger groups is particularly important when considering the potential role of music for large-scale social bonding. The current study recruited individuals from a community choir that met in both small (n = 20 - 80) and large (a 'megachoir' combining individuals from the smaller subchoirs n = 232) group contexts. Participants gave self-report measures (via a survey) of social bonding and had pain threshold measurements taken (as a proxy for endorphin release) before and after 90 minutes of singing. Results showed that feelings of inclusion, connectivity, positive affect, and measures of endorphin release all increased across singing rehearsals and that the influence of group singing was comparable for pain thresholds in the large versus small group context. Levels of social closeness were found to be greater at pre- and post-levels for the small choir condition. However, the large choir condition experienced a greater change in social closeness as compared to the small condition. The finding that singing together fosters social closeness - even in large contexts where individuals are not known to each other - is consistent with evolutionary accounts that emphasize the role of music in social bonding, particularly in the context of creating larger cohesive groups than other primates are able to manage.

AB - Over our evolutionary history, humans have faced the problem of how to create and maintain social bonds in progressively larger groups compared to those of our primate ancestors. Evidence from historical and anthropological records suggests that group music-making might act as a mechanism by which this large-scale social bonding could occur. While previous research has shown effects of music making on social bonds in small group contexts, the question of whether this effect 'scales up' to larger groups is particularly important when considering the potential role of music for large-scale social bonding. The current study recruited individuals from a community choir that met in both small (n = 20 - 80) and large (a 'megachoir' combining individuals from the smaller subchoirs n = 232) group contexts. Participants gave self-report measures (via a survey) of social bonding and had pain threshold measurements taken (as a proxy for endorphin release) before and after 90 minutes of singing. Results showed that feelings of inclusion, connectivity, positive affect, and measures of endorphin release all increased across singing rehearsals and that the influence of group singing was comparable for pain thresholds in the large versus small group context. Levels of social closeness were found to be greater at pre- and post-levels for the small choir condition. However, the large choir condition experienced a greater change in social closeness as compared to the small condition. The finding that singing together fosters social closeness - even in large contexts where individuals are not known to each other - is consistent with evolutionary accounts that emphasize the role of music in social bonding, particularly in the context of creating larger cohesive groups than other primates are able to manage.

U2 - 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002

DO - 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.10.002

M3 - Journal article

VL - 37

SP - 152

EP - 158

JO - Evolution and Human Behavior

JF - Evolution and Human Behavior

SN - 1090-5138

IS - 2

ER -