Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks

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Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks. / Zanata, Thais B.; Dalsgaard, Bo; Passos, Fernando C.; Cotton, Peter A.; Roper, James J.; Maruyama, Pietro K.; Fischer, Erich; Schleuning, Matthias; Gonzalez, Ana M. Martin; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Franklin, Donald C.; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcon, Ruben; Araujo, Andrea C.; Araujo, Francielle P.; de Azevedo-Junior, Severino M.; Baquero, Andrea C.; Boehning-Gaese, Katrin; Carstensen, Daniel W.; Chupil, Henrique; Coelho, Aline G.; Faria, Rogerio R.; Horak, David; Ingversen, Tanja T.; Janecek, Stepan; Kohler, Glauco; Lara, Carlos; Las-Casas, Flor M. G.; Lopes, Ariadna V.; Machado, Adriana O.; Machado, Caio G.; Machado, Isabel C.; Maglianesi, Maria A.; Malucelli, Tiago S.; Mohd-Azlan, Jayasilan; Moura, Alan C.; Oliveira, Genilda M.; Oliveira, Paulo E.; Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Riegert, Jan; Rodrigues, Licleia C.; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana; Rui, Ana M.; Sazima, Marlies; Schmid, Baptiste; Sedlacek, Ondrej; Timmermann, Allan; Vollstaedt, Maximilian G. R.; Wang, Zhiheng; Watts, Stella; Rahbek, Carsten; Varassin, Isabela G.

In: Diversity and Distributions, Vol. 44, No. 8, 08.2017, p. 1891-1910.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Zanata, TB, Dalsgaard, B, Passos, FC, Cotton, PA, Roper, JJ, Maruyama, PK, Fischer, E, Schleuning, M, Gonzalez, AMM, Vizentin-Bugoni, J, Franklin, DC, Abrahamczyk, S, Alarcon, R, Araujo, AC, Araujo, FP, de Azevedo-Junior, SM, Baquero, AC, Boehning-Gaese, K, Carstensen, DW, Chupil, H, Coelho, AG, Faria, RR, Horak, D, Ingversen, TT, Janecek, S, Kohler, G, Lara, C, Las-Casas, FMG, Lopes, AV, Machado, AO, Machado, CG, Machado, IC, Maglianesi, MA, Malucelli, TS, Mohd-Azlan, J, Moura, AC, Oliveira, GM, Oliveira, PE, Ornelas, JF, Riegert, J, Rodrigues, LC, Rosero-Lasprilla, L, Rui, AM, Sazima, M, Schmid, B, Sedlacek, O, Timmermann, A, Vollstaedt, MGR, Wang, Z, Watts, S, Rahbek, C & Varassin, IG 2017, 'Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks', Diversity and Distributions, vol. 44, no. 8, pp. 1891-1910. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13045

APA

Zanata, T. B., Dalsgaard, B., Passos, F. C., Cotton, P. A., Roper, J. J., Maruyama, P. K., Fischer, E., Schleuning, M., Gonzalez, A. M. M., Vizentin-Bugoni, J., Franklin, D. C., Abrahamczyk, S., Alarcon, R., Araujo, A. C., Araujo, F. P., de Azevedo-Junior, S. M., Baquero, A. C., Boehning-Gaese, K., Carstensen, D. W., ... Varassin, I. G. (2017). Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks. Diversity and Distributions, 44(8), 1891-1910. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13045

CBE

Zanata TB, Dalsgaard B, Passos FC, Cotton PA, Roper JJ, Maruyama PK, Fischer E, Schleuning M, Gonzalez AMM, Vizentin-Bugoni J, Franklin DC, Abrahamczyk S, Alarcon R, Araujo AC, Araujo FP, de Azevedo-Junior SM, Baquero AC, Boehning-Gaese K, Carstensen DW, Chupil H, Coelho AG, Faria RR, Horak D, Ingversen TT, Janecek S, Kohler G, Lara C, Las-Casas FMG, Lopes AV, Machado AO, Machado CG, Machado IC, Maglianesi MA, Malucelli TS, Mohd-Azlan J, Moura AC, Oliveira GM, Oliveira PE, Ornelas JF, Riegert J, Rodrigues LC, Rosero-Lasprilla L, Rui AM, Sazima M, Schmid B, Sedlacek O, Timmermann A, Vollstaedt MGR, Wang Z, Watts S, Rahbek C, Varassin IG. 2017. Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks. Diversity and Distributions. 44(8):1891-1910. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13045

MLA

Zanata, Thais B. et al. "Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks". Diversity and Distributions. 2017, 44(8). 1891-1910. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13045

Vancouver

Zanata TB, Dalsgaard B, Passos FC, Cotton PA, Roper JJ, Maruyama PK et al. Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks. Diversity and Distributions. 2017 Aug;44(8):1891-1910. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13045

Author

Zanata, Thais B. ; Dalsgaard, Bo ; Passos, Fernando C. ; Cotton, Peter A. ; Roper, James J. ; Maruyama, Pietro K. ; Fischer, Erich ; Schleuning, Matthias ; Gonzalez, Ana M. Martin ; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson ; Franklin, Donald C. ; Abrahamczyk, Stefan ; Alarcon, Ruben ; Araujo, Andrea C. ; Araujo, Francielle P. ; de Azevedo-Junior, Severino M. ; Baquero, Andrea C. ; Boehning-Gaese, Katrin ; Carstensen, Daniel W. ; Chupil, Henrique ; Coelho, Aline G. ; Faria, Rogerio R. ; Horak, David ; Ingversen, Tanja T. ; Janecek, Stepan ; Kohler, Glauco ; Lara, Carlos ; Las-Casas, Flor M. G. ; Lopes, Ariadna V. ; Machado, Adriana O. ; Machado, Caio G. ; Machado, Isabel C. ; Maglianesi, Maria A. ; Malucelli, Tiago S. ; Mohd-Azlan, Jayasilan ; Moura, Alan C. ; Oliveira, Genilda M. ; Oliveira, Paulo E. ; Ornelas, Juan Francisco ; Riegert, Jan ; Rodrigues, Licleia C. ; Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana ; Rui, Ana M. ; Sazima, Marlies ; Schmid, Baptiste ; Sedlacek, Ondrej ; Timmermann, Allan ; Vollstaedt, Maximilian G. R. ; Wang, Zhiheng ; Watts, Stella ; Rahbek, Carsten ; Varassin, Isabela G. / Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks. In: Diversity and Distributions. 2017 ; Vol. 44, No. 8. pp. 1891-1910.

Bibtex

@article{b5b27d9068c74f63b70ba61c6276fa0d,
title = "Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks",
abstract = "Aim Among the world's three major nectar-feeding bird taxa, hummingbirds are the most phenotypically specialized for nectarivory, followed by sunbirds, while the honeyeaters are the least phenotypically specialized taxa. We tested whether this phenotypic specialization gradient is also found in the interaction patterns with their floral resources.Location Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania/Australia.Methods We compiled interaction networks between birds and floral resources for 79 hummingbird, nine sunbird and 33 honeyeater communities. Interaction specialization was quantified through connectance (C), complementary specialization (H-2), binary (Q(B)) and weighted modularity (Q), with both observed and null-model corrected values. We compared interaction specialization among the three types of bird-flower communities, both independently and while controlling for potential confounding variables, such as plant species richness, asymmetry, latitude, insularity, topography, sampling methods and intensity.Results Hummingbird-flower networks were more specialized than honeyeater-flower networks. Specifically, hummingbird-flower networks had a lower proportion of realized interactions (lower C), decreased niche overlap (greater H-2) and greater modularity (greater Q(B)). However, we found no significant differences between hummingbird- and sunbird-flower networks, nor between sunbird- and honeyeater-flower networks.Main conclusions As expected, hummingbirds and their floral resources have greater interaction specialization than honeyeaters, possibly because of greater phenotypic specialization and greater floral resource richness in the New World. Interaction specialization in sunbird-flower communities was similar to both hummingbird-flower and honeyeater-flower communities. This may either be due to the relatively small number of sunbird-flower networks available, or because sunbird-flower communities share features of both hummingbird-flower communities (specialized floral shapes) and honeyeater-flower communities (fewer floral resources). These results suggest a link between interaction specialization and both phenotypic specialization and floral resource richness within bird-flower communities at a global scale.",
keywords = "honeyeaters, hummingbirds, modularity, niche partitioning, ornithophily, plant-animal interactions, specialization, sunbirds, SEED-DISPERSAL NETWORKS, NECTAR-FEEDING BIRDS, POLLINATION SYSTEMS, ECOLOGICAL SPECIALIZATION, MUTUALISTIC NETWORKS, SPECIES RICHNESS, RAIN-FOREST, PLANT, HUMMINGBIRDS, EVOLUTIONARY",
author = "Zanata, {Thais B.} and Bo Dalsgaard and Passos, {Fernando C.} and Cotton, {Peter A.} and Roper, {James J.} and Maruyama, {Pietro K.} and Erich Fischer and Matthias Schleuning and Gonzalez, {Ana M. Martin} and Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni and Franklin, {Donald C.} and Stefan Abrahamczyk and Ruben Alarcon and Araujo, {Andrea C.} and Araujo, {Francielle P.} and {de Azevedo-Junior}, {Severino M.} and Baquero, {Andrea C.} and Katrin Boehning-Gaese and Carstensen, {Daniel W.} and Henrique Chupil and Coelho, {Aline G.} and Faria, {Rogerio R.} and David Horak and Ingversen, {Tanja T.} and Stepan Janecek and Glauco Kohler and Carlos Lara and Las-Casas, {Flor M. G.} and Lopes, {Ariadna V.} and Machado, {Adriana O.} and Machado, {Caio G.} and Machado, {Isabel C.} and Maglianesi, {Maria A.} and Malucelli, {Tiago S.} and Jayasilan Mohd-Azlan and Moura, {Alan C.} and Oliveira, {Genilda M.} and Oliveira, {Paulo E.} and Ornelas, {Juan Francisco} and Jan Riegert and Rodrigues, {Licleia C.} and Liliana Rosero-Lasprilla and Rui, {Ana M.} and Marlies Sazima and Baptiste Schmid and Ondrej Sedlacek and Allan Timmermann and Vollstaedt, {Maximilian G. R.} and Zhiheng Wang and Stella Watts and Carsten Rahbek and Varassin, {Isabela G.}",
year = "2017",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1111/jbi.13045",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "1891--1910",
journal = "Diversity and Distributions",
issn = "1366-9516",
publisher = "Jossey-Bass",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global patterns of interaction specialization in bird-flower networks

AU - Zanata, Thais B.

AU - Dalsgaard, Bo

AU - Passos, Fernando C.

AU - Cotton, Peter A.

AU - Roper, James J.

AU - Maruyama, Pietro K.

AU - Fischer, Erich

AU - Schleuning, Matthias

AU - Gonzalez, Ana M. Martin

AU - Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson

AU - Franklin, Donald C.

AU - Abrahamczyk, Stefan

AU - Alarcon, Ruben

AU - Araujo, Andrea C.

AU - Araujo, Francielle P.

AU - de Azevedo-Junior, Severino M.

AU - Baquero, Andrea C.

AU - Boehning-Gaese, Katrin

AU - Carstensen, Daniel W.

AU - Chupil, Henrique

AU - Coelho, Aline G.

AU - Faria, Rogerio R.

AU - Horak, David

AU - Ingversen, Tanja T.

AU - Janecek, Stepan

AU - Kohler, Glauco

AU - Lara, Carlos

AU - Las-Casas, Flor M. G.

AU - Lopes, Ariadna V.

AU - Machado, Adriana O.

AU - Machado, Caio G.

AU - Machado, Isabel C.

AU - Maglianesi, Maria A.

AU - Malucelli, Tiago S.

AU - Mohd-Azlan, Jayasilan

AU - Moura, Alan C.

AU - Oliveira, Genilda M.

AU - Oliveira, Paulo E.

AU - Ornelas, Juan Francisco

AU - Riegert, Jan

AU - Rodrigues, Licleia C.

AU - Rosero-Lasprilla, Liliana

AU - Rui, Ana M.

AU - Sazima, Marlies

AU - Schmid, Baptiste

AU - Sedlacek, Ondrej

AU - Timmermann, Allan

AU - Vollstaedt, Maximilian G. R.

AU - Wang, Zhiheng

AU - Watts, Stella

AU - Rahbek, Carsten

AU - Varassin, Isabela G.

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - Aim Among the world's three major nectar-feeding bird taxa, hummingbirds are the most phenotypically specialized for nectarivory, followed by sunbirds, while the honeyeaters are the least phenotypically specialized taxa. We tested whether this phenotypic specialization gradient is also found in the interaction patterns with their floral resources.Location Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania/Australia.Methods We compiled interaction networks between birds and floral resources for 79 hummingbird, nine sunbird and 33 honeyeater communities. Interaction specialization was quantified through connectance (C), complementary specialization (H-2), binary (Q(B)) and weighted modularity (Q), with both observed and null-model corrected values. We compared interaction specialization among the three types of bird-flower communities, both independently and while controlling for potential confounding variables, such as plant species richness, asymmetry, latitude, insularity, topography, sampling methods and intensity.Results Hummingbird-flower networks were more specialized than honeyeater-flower networks. Specifically, hummingbird-flower networks had a lower proportion of realized interactions (lower C), decreased niche overlap (greater H-2) and greater modularity (greater Q(B)). However, we found no significant differences between hummingbird- and sunbird-flower networks, nor between sunbird- and honeyeater-flower networks.Main conclusions As expected, hummingbirds and their floral resources have greater interaction specialization than honeyeaters, possibly because of greater phenotypic specialization and greater floral resource richness in the New World. Interaction specialization in sunbird-flower communities was similar to both hummingbird-flower and honeyeater-flower communities. This may either be due to the relatively small number of sunbird-flower networks available, or because sunbird-flower communities share features of both hummingbird-flower communities (specialized floral shapes) and honeyeater-flower communities (fewer floral resources). These results suggest a link between interaction specialization and both phenotypic specialization and floral resource richness within bird-flower communities at a global scale.

AB - Aim Among the world's three major nectar-feeding bird taxa, hummingbirds are the most phenotypically specialized for nectarivory, followed by sunbirds, while the honeyeaters are the least phenotypically specialized taxa. We tested whether this phenotypic specialization gradient is also found in the interaction patterns with their floral resources.Location Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania/Australia.Methods We compiled interaction networks between birds and floral resources for 79 hummingbird, nine sunbird and 33 honeyeater communities. Interaction specialization was quantified through connectance (C), complementary specialization (H-2), binary (Q(B)) and weighted modularity (Q), with both observed and null-model corrected values. We compared interaction specialization among the three types of bird-flower communities, both independently and while controlling for potential confounding variables, such as plant species richness, asymmetry, latitude, insularity, topography, sampling methods and intensity.Results Hummingbird-flower networks were more specialized than honeyeater-flower networks. Specifically, hummingbird-flower networks had a lower proportion of realized interactions (lower C), decreased niche overlap (greater H-2) and greater modularity (greater Q(B)). However, we found no significant differences between hummingbird- and sunbird-flower networks, nor between sunbird- and honeyeater-flower networks.Main conclusions As expected, hummingbirds and their floral resources have greater interaction specialization than honeyeaters, possibly because of greater phenotypic specialization and greater floral resource richness in the New World. Interaction specialization in sunbird-flower communities was similar to both hummingbird-flower and honeyeater-flower communities. This may either be due to the relatively small number of sunbird-flower networks available, or because sunbird-flower communities share features of both hummingbird-flower communities (specialized floral shapes) and honeyeater-flower communities (fewer floral resources). These results suggest a link between interaction specialization and both phenotypic specialization and floral resource richness within bird-flower communities at a global scale.

KW - honeyeaters

KW - hummingbirds

KW - modularity

KW - niche partitioning

KW - ornithophily

KW - plant-animal interactions

KW - specialization

KW - sunbirds

KW - SEED-DISPERSAL NETWORKS

KW - NECTAR-FEEDING BIRDS

KW - POLLINATION SYSTEMS

KW - ECOLOGICAL SPECIALIZATION

KW - MUTUALISTIC NETWORKS

KW - SPECIES RICHNESS

KW - RAIN-FOREST

KW - PLANT

KW - HUMMINGBIRDS

KW - EVOLUTIONARY

U2 - 10.1111/jbi.13045

DO - 10.1111/jbi.13045

M3 - Journal article

VL - 44

SP - 1891

EP - 1910

JO - Diversity and Distributions

JF - Diversity and Distributions

SN - 1366-9516

IS - 8

ER -