Department of Economics and Business Economics

Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia: Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia : Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. / Charlson, Fiona J; Ferrari, Alize J; Santomauro, Damian F; Diminic, Sandra; Stockings, Emily; Scott, James G; McGrath, John J; Whiteford, Harvey A.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 44, No. 6, 2018, p. 1195-1203.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Charlson, FJ, Ferrari, AJ, Santomauro, DF, Diminic, S, Stockings, E, Scott, JG, McGrath, JJ & Whiteford, HA 2018, 'Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia: Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016', Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 1195-1203. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sby058

APA

Charlson, F. J., Ferrari, A. J., Santomauro, D. F., Diminic, S., Stockings, E., Scott, J. G., McGrath, J. J., & Whiteford, H. A. (2018). Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia: Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 44(6), 1195-1203. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sby058

CBE

Charlson FJ, Ferrari AJ, Santomauro DF, Diminic S, Stockings E, Scott JG, McGrath JJ, Whiteford HA. 2018. Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia: Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Schizophrenia Bulletin. 44(6):1195-1203. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sby058

MLA

Vancouver

Charlson FJ, Ferrari AJ, Santomauro DF, Diminic S, Stockings E, Scott JG et al. Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia: Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2018;44(6):1195-1203. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sby058

Author

Charlson, Fiona J ; Ferrari, Alize J ; Santomauro, Damian F ; Diminic, Sandra ; Stockings, Emily ; Scott, James G ; McGrath, John J ; Whiteford, Harvey A. / Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia : Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2018 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 1195-1203.

Bibtex

@article{afbbb26a187d4c188c13219418c8d5a6,
title = "Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia: Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016",
abstract = "Introduction: The global burden of disease (GBD) studies have derived detailed and comparable epidemiological and burden of disease estimates for schizophrenia. We report GBD 2016 estimates of schizophrenia prevalence and burden of disease with disaggregation by age, sex, year, and for all countries.Method: We conducted a systematic review to identify studies reporting the prevalence, incidence, remission, and/or excess mortality associated with schizophrenia. Reported estimates which met our inclusion criteria were entered into a Bayesian meta-regression tool used in GBD 2016 to derive prevalence for 20 age groups, 7 super-regions, 21 regions, and 195 countries and territories. Burden of disease estimates were derived for acute and residual states of schizophrenia by multiplying the age-, sex-, year-, and location-specific prevalence by 2 disability weights representative of the disability experienced during these states.Findings: The systematic review found a total of 129 individual data sources. The global age-standardized point prevalence of schizophrenia in 2016 was estimated to be 0.28% (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 0.24-0.31). No sex differences were observed in prevalence. Age-standardized point prevalence rates did not vary widely across countries or regions. Globally, prevalent cases rose from 13.1 (95% UI: 11.6-14.8) million in 1990 to 20.9 (95% UI: 18.5-23.4) million cases in 2016. Schizophrenia contributes 13.4 (95% UI: 9.9-16.7) million years of life lived with disability to burden of disease globally.Conclusion: Although schizophrenia is a low prevalence disorder, the burden of disease is substantial. Our modeling suggests that significant population growth and aging has led to a large and increasing disease burden attributable to schizophrenia, particularly for middle income countries.",
keywords = "CHINA, COMMON, DISABILITY WEIGHTS, INJURIES, LIFE EXPECTANCY, MENTAL-DISORDERS, MORTALITY, PREVALENCE, RECALL, SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS, burden of disease, epidemiology, mental health, schizophrenia, Global Burden of Disease/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Middle Aged, Male, Schizophrenia/epidemiology, Adult, Female",
author = "Charlson, {Fiona J} and Ferrari, {Alize J} and Santomauro, {Damian F} and Sandra Diminic and Emily Stockings and Scott, {James G} and McGrath, {John J} and Whiteford, {Harvey A}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1093/schbul/sby058",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "1195--1203",
journal = "Schizophrenia Bulletin",
issn = "0586-7614",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global Epidemiology and Burden of Schizophrenia

T2 - Findings From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

AU - Charlson, Fiona J

AU - Ferrari, Alize J

AU - Santomauro, Damian F

AU - Diminic, Sandra

AU - Stockings, Emily

AU - Scott, James G

AU - McGrath, John J

AU - Whiteford, Harvey A

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Introduction: The global burden of disease (GBD) studies have derived detailed and comparable epidemiological and burden of disease estimates for schizophrenia. We report GBD 2016 estimates of schizophrenia prevalence and burden of disease with disaggregation by age, sex, year, and for all countries.Method: We conducted a systematic review to identify studies reporting the prevalence, incidence, remission, and/or excess mortality associated with schizophrenia. Reported estimates which met our inclusion criteria were entered into a Bayesian meta-regression tool used in GBD 2016 to derive prevalence for 20 age groups, 7 super-regions, 21 regions, and 195 countries and territories. Burden of disease estimates were derived for acute and residual states of schizophrenia by multiplying the age-, sex-, year-, and location-specific prevalence by 2 disability weights representative of the disability experienced during these states.Findings: The systematic review found a total of 129 individual data sources. The global age-standardized point prevalence of schizophrenia in 2016 was estimated to be 0.28% (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 0.24-0.31). No sex differences were observed in prevalence. Age-standardized point prevalence rates did not vary widely across countries or regions. Globally, prevalent cases rose from 13.1 (95% UI: 11.6-14.8) million in 1990 to 20.9 (95% UI: 18.5-23.4) million cases in 2016. Schizophrenia contributes 13.4 (95% UI: 9.9-16.7) million years of life lived with disability to burden of disease globally.Conclusion: Although schizophrenia is a low prevalence disorder, the burden of disease is substantial. Our modeling suggests that significant population growth and aging has led to a large and increasing disease burden attributable to schizophrenia, particularly for middle income countries.

AB - Introduction: The global burden of disease (GBD) studies have derived detailed and comparable epidemiological and burden of disease estimates for schizophrenia. We report GBD 2016 estimates of schizophrenia prevalence and burden of disease with disaggregation by age, sex, year, and for all countries.Method: We conducted a systematic review to identify studies reporting the prevalence, incidence, remission, and/or excess mortality associated with schizophrenia. Reported estimates which met our inclusion criteria were entered into a Bayesian meta-regression tool used in GBD 2016 to derive prevalence for 20 age groups, 7 super-regions, 21 regions, and 195 countries and territories. Burden of disease estimates were derived for acute and residual states of schizophrenia by multiplying the age-, sex-, year-, and location-specific prevalence by 2 disability weights representative of the disability experienced during these states.Findings: The systematic review found a total of 129 individual data sources. The global age-standardized point prevalence of schizophrenia in 2016 was estimated to be 0.28% (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 0.24-0.31). No sex differences were observed in prevalence. Age-standardized point prevalence rates did not vary widely across countries or regions. Globally, prevalent cases rose from 13.1 (95% UI: 11.6-14.8) million in 1990 to 20.9 (95% UI: 18.5-23.4) million cases in 2016. Schizophrenia contributes 13.4 (95% UI: 9.9-16.7) million years of life lived with disability to burden of disease globally.Conclusion: Although schizophrenia is a low prevalence disorder, the burden of disease is substantial. Our modeling suggests that significant population growth and aging has led to a large and increasing disease burden attributable to schizophrenia, particularly for middle income countries.

KW - CHINA

KW - COMMON

KW - DISABILITY WEIGHTS

KW - INJURIES

KW - LIFE EXPECTANCY

KW - MENTAL-DISORDERS

KW - MORTALITY

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - RECALL

KW - SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS

KW - burden of disease

KW - epidemiology

KW - mental health

KW - schizophrenia

KW - Global Burden of Disease/statistics & numerical data

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Male

KW - Schizophrenia/epidemiology

KW - Adult

KW - Female

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051429479&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/schbul/sby058

DO - 10.1093/schbul/sby058

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29762765

VL - 44

SP - 1195

EP - 1203

JO - Schizophrenia Bulletin

JF - Schizophrenia Bulletin

SN - 0586-7614

IS - 6

ER -