Genome wide association study of body weight and feed efficiency traits in a commercial broiler chicken population, a re-visitation

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  • Wossenie Mebratie, Wageningen Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University and Research Centre
  • ,
  • Henry Reyer, Institute for Genome Biology
  • ,
  • Klaus Wimmers, Institute for Genome Biology
  • ,
  • Henk Bovenhuis, Wageningen Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University and Research Centre
  • ,
  • Just Jensen

Genome wide association study was conducted using a mixed linear model (MLM) approach that accounted for family structure to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and candidate genes associated with body weight (BW) and feed efficiency (FE) traits in a broiler chicken population. The results of the MLM approach were compared with the results of a general linear model approach that does not take family structure in to account. In total, 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) and 21 SNPs, were identified to be significantly associated with BW traits and 5 QTL and 5 SNPs were found associated with FE traits using MLM approach. Besides some overlaps between the results of the two GWAS approaches, there are considerable differences in the detected QTL. Even though the genomic inflation factor (λ) values indicate that there is no strong family structure in this population, using models that account for the existing family structure may reduce bias and increase accuracy of the estimated SNP effects in the association analysis. The SNPs and candidate genes identified in this study provide information on the genetic background of BW and FE traits in broiler chickens and might be used as prior information for genomic selection.

Original languageEnglish
Article number922
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Number of pages10
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

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