Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects. / Gaia Collaboration.

In: Astronomy & Astrophysics, Vol. 616, 13, 10.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Gaia Collaboration 2018, 'Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects', Astronomy & Astrophysics, vol. 616, 13. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201832900

APA

Gaia Collaboration (2018). Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 616, [13]. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201832900

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Gaia Collaboration. Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects. Astronomy & Astrophysics. 2018 Aug 10;616. 13. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201832900

Author

Gaia Collaboration. / Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects. In: Astronomy & Astrophysics. 2018 ; Vol. 616.

Bibtex

@article{2463ea3856f1459787996a1928cdfba1,
title = "Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects",
abstract = "Context. The Gaia spacecraft of the European Space Agency (ESA) has been securing observations of solar system objects (SSOs) since the beginning of its operations. Data Release 2 (DR2) contains the observations of a selected sample of 14,099 SSOs. These asteroids have been already identified and have been numbered by the Minor Planet Center repository. Positions are provided for each Gaia observation at CCD level. As additional information, complementary to astrometry, the apparent brightness of SSOs in the unfiltered G band is also provided for selected observations.Aims. We explain the processing of SSO data, and describe the criteria we used to select the sample published in Gaia DR2. We then explore the data set to assess its quality.Methods. To exploit the main data product for the solar system in Gaia DR2, which is the epoch astrometry of asteroids, it is necessary to take into account the unusual properties of the uncertainty, as the position information is nearly one-dimensional. When this aspect is handled appropriately, an orbit fit can be obtained with post-fit residuals that are overall consistent with the a-priori error model that was used to define individual values of the astrometric uncertainty. The role of both random and systematic errors is described. The distribution of residuals allowed us to identify possible contaminants in the data set (such as stars). Photometry in the G band was compared to computed values from reference asteroid shapes and to the flux registered at the corresponding epochs by the red and blue photometers (RP and BP).Results. The overall astrometric performance is close to the expectations, with an optimal range of brightness G similar to 12 - 17. In this range, the typical transit-level accuracy is well below 1 mas. For fainter asteroids, the growing photon noise deteriorates the performance. Asteroids brighter than G similar to 12 are affected by a lower performance of the processing of their signals. The dramatic improvement brought by Gaia DR2 astrometry of SSOs is demonstrated by comparisons to the archive data and by preliminary tests on the detection of subtle non-gravitational effects.",
keywords = "astrometry, minor planets, asteroids: general, methods: data analysis, space vehicles: instruments, ASTEROIDS, PHOTOMETRY, ASTROMETRY, INVERSION, SCIENCE",
author = "F. Spoto and P. Tanga and F. Mignard and J. Berthier and B. Carry and A. Cellino and A. Dell'Oro and D. Hestroffer and K. Muinonen and T. Pauwels and Petit, {J. -M.} and P. David and {De Angeli}, F. and M. Delbo and B. Frezouls and L. Galluccio and M. Granvik and J. Guiraud and J. Hernandez and C. Ordenovic and J. Portell and E. Poujoulet and W. Thuillot and G. Walmsley and Brown, {A. G. A.} and A. Vallenari and T. Prusti and {de Bruijne}, {J. H. J.} and C. Babusiaux and Bailer-Jones, {C. A. L.} and M. Biermann and Evans, {D. W.} and L. Eyer and F. Jansen and C. Jordi and Klioner, {S. A.} and U. Lammers and L. Lindegren and X. Luri and C. Panem and D. Pourbaix and S. Randich and P. Sartoretti and Siddiqui, {H. I.} and C. Soubiran and {van Leeuwen}, F. and Walton, {N. A.} and F. Arenou and D. Bossini and {von Essen}, C. and {Gaia Collaboration}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1051/0004-6361/201832900",
language = "English",
volume = "616",
journal = "Astronomy & Astrophysics",
issn = "0004-6361",
publisher = "E D P Sciences",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gaia Data Release 2 Observations of solar system objects

AU - Spoto, F.

AU - Tanga, P.

AU - Mignard, F.

AU - Berthier, J.

AU - Carry, B.

AU - Cellino, A.

AU - Dell'Oro, A.

AU - Hestroffer, D.

AU - Muinonen, K.

AU - Pauwels, T.

AU - Petit, J. -M.

AU - David, P.

AU - De Angeli, F.

AU - Delbo, M.

AU - Frezouls, B.

AU - Galluccio, L.

AU - Granvik, M.

AU - Guiraud, J.

AU - Hernandez, J.

AU - Ordenovic, C.

AU - Portell, J.

AU - Poujoulet, E.

AU - Thuillot, W.

AU - Walmsley, G.

AU - Brown, A. G. A.

AU - Vallenari, A.

AU - Prusti, T.

AU - de Bruijne, J. H. J.

AU - Babusiaux, C.

AU - Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

AU - Biermann, M.

AU - Evans, D. W.

AU - Eyer, L.

AU - Jansen, F.

AU - Jordi, C.

AU - Klioner, S. A.

AU - Lammers, U.

AU - Lindegren, L.

AU - Luri, X.

AU - Panem, C.

AU - Pourbaix, D.

AU - Randich, S.

AU - Sartoretti, P.

AU - Siddiqui, H. I.

AU - Soubiran, C.

AU - van Leeuwen, F.

AU - Walton, N. A.

AU - Arenou, F.

AU - Bossini, D.

AU - von Essen, C.

AU - Gaia Collaboration

PY - 2018/8/10

Y1 - 2018/8/10

N2 - Context. The Gaia spacecraft of the European Space Agency (ESA) has been securing observations of solar system objects (SSOs) since the beginning of its operations. Data Release 2 (DR2) contains the observations of a selected sample of 14,099 SSOs. These asteroids have been already identified and have been numbered by the Minor Planet Center repository. Positions are provided for each Gaia observation at CCD level. As additional information, complementary to astrometry, the apparent brightness of SSOs in the unfiltered G band is also provided for selected observations.Aims. We explain the processing of SSO data, and describe the criteria we used to select the sample published in Gaia DR2. We then explore the data set to assess its quality.Methods. To exploit the main data product for the solar system in Gaia DR2, which is the epoch astrometry of asteroids, it is necessary to take into account the unusual properties of the uncertainty, as the position information is nearly one-dimensional. When this aspect is handled appropriately, an orbit fit can be obtained with post-fit residuals that are overall consistent with the a-priori error model that was used to define individual values of the astrometric uncertainty. The role of both random and systematic errors is described. The distribution of residuals allowed us to identify possible contaminants in the data set (such as stars). Photometry in the G band was compared to computed values from reference asteroid shapes and to the flux registered at the corresponding epochs by the red and blue photometers (RP and BP).Results. The overall astrometric performance is close to the expectations, with an optimal range of brightness G similar to 12 - 17. In this range, the typical transit-level accuracy is well below 1 mas. For fainter asteroids, the growing photon noise deteriorates the performance. Asteroids brighter than G similar to 12 are affected by a lower performance of the processing of their signals. The dramatic improvement brought by Gaia DR2 astrometry of SSOs is demonstrated by comparisons to the archive data and by preliminary tests on the detection of subtle non-gravitational effects.

AB - Context. The Gaia spacecraft of the European Space Agency (ESA) has been securing observations of solar system objects (SSOs) since the beginning of its operations. Data Release 2 (DR2) contains the observations of a selected sample of 14,099 SSOs. These asteroids have been already identified and have been numbered by the Minor Planet Center repository. Positions are provided for each Gaia observation at CCD level. As additional information, complementary to astrometry, the apparent brightness of SSOs in the unfiltered G band is also provided for selected observations.Aims. We explain the processing of SSO data, and describe the criteria we used to select the sample published in Gaia DR2. We then explore the data set to assess its quality.Methods. To exploit the main data product for the solar system in Gaia DR2, which is the epoch astrometry of asteroids, it is necessary to take into account the unusual properties of the uncertainty, as the position information is nearly one-dimensional. When this aspect is handled appropriately, an orbit fit can be obtained with post-fit residuals that are overall consistent with the a-priori error model that was used to define individual values of the astrometric uncertainty. The role of both random and systematic errors is described. The distribution of residuals allowed us to identify possible contaminants in the data set (such as stars). Photometry in the G band was compared to computed values from reference asteroid shapes and to the flux registered at the corresponding epochs by the red and blue photometers (RP and BP).Results. The overall astrometric performance is close to the expectations, with an optimal range of brightness G similar to 12 - 17. In this range, the typical transit-level accuracy is well below 1 mas. For fainter asteroids, the growing photon noise deteriorates the performance. Asteroids brighter than G similar to 12 are affected by a lower performance of the processing of their signals. The dramatic improvement brought by Gaia DR2 astrometry of SSOs is demonstrated by comparisons to the archive data and by preliminary tests on the detection of subtle non-gravitational effects.

KW - astrometry

KW - minor planets, asteroids: general

KW - methods: data analysis

KW - space vehicles: instruments

KW - ASTEROIDS

KW - PHOTOMETRY

KW - ASTROMETRY

KW - INVERSION

KW - SCIENCE

U2 - 10.1051/0004-6361/201832900

DO - 10.1051/0004-6361/201832900

M3 - Journal article

VL - 616

JO - Astronomy & Astrophysics

JF - Astronomy & Astrophysics

SN - 0004-6361

M1 - 13

ER -