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Functional connectivity of music-induced analgesia in fibromyalgia

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Functional connectivity of music-induced analgesia in fibromyalgia. / Pando-Naude, Victor; Barrios, Fernando A.; Alcauter, Sarael; Pasaye, Erick H.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Vuust, Peter; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 9, 15486, 12.2019.

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@article{f03ab6cdc55c41dcb0753f90bb08ef28,
title = "Functional connectivity of music-induced analgesia in fibromyalgia",
abstract = "Listening to self-chosen, pleasant and relaxing music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic centralized pain condition. However, the neural correlates of this effect are fairly unknown. In our study, we wished to investigate the neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) in FM patients. To do this, we studied 20 FM patients and 20 matched healthy controls (HC) acquiring rs-fMRI with a 3T MRI scanner, and pain data before and after two 5-min auditory conditions: music and noise. We performed resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) seed-based correlation analyses (SCA) using pain and analgesia-related ROIs to determine the effects before and after the music intervention in FM and HC, and its correlation with pain reports. We found significant differences in baseline rs-FC between FM and HC. Both groups showed changes in rs-FC after the music condition. FM patients reported MIA that was significantly correlated with rs-FC decrease between the angular gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, and rs-FC increase between amygdala and middle frontal gyrus. These areas are related to autobiographical and limbic processes, and auditory attention, suggesting MIA may arise as a consequence of top-down modulation, probably originated by distraction, relaxation, positive emotion, or a combination of these mechanisms.",
author = "Victor Pando-Naude and Barrios, {Fernando A.} and Sarael Alcauter and Pasaye, {Erick H.} and Lene Vase and Elvira Brattico and Peter Vuust and Garza-Villarreal, {Eduardo A.}",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1038/s41598-019-51990-4",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional connectivity of music-induced analgesia in fibromyalgia

AU - Pando-Naude, Victor

AU - Barrios, Fernando A.

AU - Alcauter, Sarael

AU - Pasaye, Erick H.

AU - Vase, Lene

AU - Brattico, Elvira

AU - Vuust, Peter

AU - Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Listening to self-chosen, pleasant and relaxing music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic centralized pain condition. However, the neural correlates of this effect are fairly unknown. In our study, we wished to investigate the neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) in FM patients. To do this, we studied 20 FM patients and 20 matched healthy controls (HC) acquiring rs-fMRI with a 3T MRI scanner, and pain data before and after two 5-min auditory conditions: music and noise. We performed resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) seed-based correlation analyses (SCA) using pain and analgesia-related ROIs to determine the effects before and after the music intervention in FM and HC, and its correlation with pain reports. We found significant differences in baseline rs-FC between FM and HC. Both groups showed changes in rs-FC after the music condition. FM patients reported MIA that was significantly correlated with rs-FC decrease between the angular gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, and rs-FC increase between amygdala and middle frontal gyrus. These areas are related to autobiographical and limbic processes, and auditory attention, suggesting MIA may arise as a consequence of top-down modulation, probably originated by distraction, relaxation, positive emotion, or a combination of these mechanisms.

AB - Listening to self-chosen, pleasant and relaxing music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic centralized pain condition. However, the neural correlates of this effect are fairly unknown. In our study, we wished to investigate the neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) in FM patients. To do this, we studied 20 FM patients and 20 matched healthy controls (HC) acquiring rs-fMRI with a 3T MRI scanner, and pain data before and after two 5-min auditory conditions: music and noise. We performed resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) seed-based correlation analyses (SCA) using pain and analgesia-related ROIs to determine the effects before and after the music intervention in FM and HC, and its correlation with pain reports. We found significant differences in baseline rs-FC between FM and HC. Both groups showed changes in rs-FC after the music condition. FM patients reported MIA that was significantly correlated with rs-FC decrease between the angular gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, and rs-FC increase between amygdala and middle frontal gyrus. These areas are related to autobiographical and limbic processes, and auditory attention, suggesting MIA may arise as a consequence of top-down modulation, probably originated by distraction, relaxation, positive emotion, or a combination of these mechanisms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074282604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-019-51990-4

DO - 10.1038/s41598-019-51990-4

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31664132

AN - SCOPUS:85074282604

VL - 9

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 15486

ER -