From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception

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From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception. / Tervaniemi, M; Brattico, E.

In: Journal of Consciousness Studies, Vol. 11, No. 3-4, 2004, p. 9-27.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Tervaniemi, M & Brattico, E 2004, 'From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception', Journal of Consciousness Studies, vol. 11, no. 3-4, pp. 9-27.

APA

Tervaniemi, M., & Brattico, E. (2004). From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 11(3-4), 9-27.

CBE

Tervaniemi M, Brattico E. 2004. From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception. Journal of Consciousness Studies. 11(3-4):9-27.

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Tervaniemi, M ; Brattico, E. / From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception. In: Journal of Consciousness Studies. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 3-4. pp. 9-27.

Bibtex

@article{4a1edbb5b2d4464488b233bc03940072,
title = "From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception",
abstract = "In this chapter we present a new approach to research in music perception allowing one to investigate how musical sound representations are formed in the human brain. By studying subjects' brain responses to unattended stimuli we can determine, for instance, whether neural circuits are more readily activated by musical sounds implicitly learned than by unfamiliar sounds even in non-musicians. Indeed, neuronal populations seem to respond more efficiently to pitch deviations within sound patterns following the rules of Western scale structure, rather than to deviations inside patterns artificially created. Moreover, neural circuits are selectively activated by mistunings inside tonal melodies or by out-of-key chords inside harmonic cadences even when attention is not directed towards the sounds. These data together suggest that incoming sounds are more efficiently processed when they match the neural templates derived from our musical culture. The existence of 'musical memories' in the auditory cortex that are effortlessly activated enabling us, e.g., to identify and recognize speech vs. music sounds can thus be postulated.",
keywords = "RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DOMINANCE, AUDITORY SENSORY MEMORY, MISMATCH NEGATIVITY MMN, HUMAN BRAIN, CORTEX, DISCRIMINATION, EXPECTANCY, HUMANS, SPEECH, REPRESENTATION",
author = "M Tervaniemi and E Brattico",
year = "2004",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "9--27",
journal = "Journal of Consciousness Studies",
issn = "1355-8250",
publisher = "Imprint Academic",
number = "3-4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - From sounds to music - Towards understanding the neurocognition of musical sound perception

AU - Tervaniemi, M

AU - Brattico, E

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - In this chapter we present a new approach to research in music perception allowing one to investigate how musical sound representations are formed in the human brain. By studying subjects' brain responses to unattended stimuli we can determine, for instance, whether neural circuits are more readily activated by musical sounds implicitly learned than by unfamiliar sounds even in non-musicians. Indeed, neuronal populations seem to respond more efficiently to pitch deviations within sound patterns following the rules of Western scale structure, rather than to deviations inside patterns artificially created. Moreover, neural circuits are selectively activated by mistunings inside tonal melodies or by out-of-key chords inside harmonic cadences even when attention is not directed towards the sounds. These data together suggest that incoming sounds are more efficiently processed when they match the neural templates derived from our musical culture. The existence of 'musical memories' in the auditory cortex that are effortlessly activated enabling us, e.g., to identify and recognize speech vs. music sounds can thus be postulated.

AB - In this chapter we present a new approach to research in music perception allowing one to investigate how musical sound representations are formed in the human brain. By studying subjects' brain responses to unattended stimuli we can determine, for instance, whether neural circuits are more readily activated by musical sounds implicitly learned than by unfamiliar sounds even in non-musicians. Indeed, neuronal populations seem to respond more efficiently to pitch deviations within sound patterns following the rules of Western scale structure, rather than to deviations inside patterns artificially created. Moreover, neural circuits are selectively activated by mistunings inside tonal melodies or by out-of-key chords inside harmonic cadences even when attention is not directed towards the sounds. These data together suggest that incoming sounds are more efficiently processed when they match the neural templates derived from our musical culture. The existence of 'musical memories' in the auditory cortex that are effortlessly activated enabling us, e.g., to identify and recognize speech vs. music sounds can thus be postulated.

KW - RIGHT-HEMISPHERE DOMINANCE

KW - AUDITORY SENSORY MEMORY

KW - MISMATCH NEGATIVITY MMN

KW - HUMAN BRAIN

KW - CORTEX

KW - DISCRIMINATION

KW - EXPECTANCY

KW - HUMANS

KW - SPEECH

KW - REPRESENTATION

M3 - Review

VL - 11

SP - 9

EP - 27

JO - Journal of Consciousness Studies

JF - Journal of Consciousness Studies

SN - 1355-8250

IS - 3-4

ER -